Posts Tagged ‘Water Resources’

Will there be enough water when the cranes return?

April 4, 2015

Will there be enough water for these Greater Sandhill Cranes when they return to the San Francisco Bay Delta this fall?

greater sandhill cranes

With the state’s snowpack down to 5% of average, the lowest ever recorded, Governor Brown has mandated a 25% water use reduction. This is the first time an involuntary water reduction mandate has been imposed. Although the means to meet this mandate has been left up to the local water districts, Brown’s executive directive includes some public assistance to replace 50 million square feet of lawns statewide with drought tolerant planting as well as reducing water use on golf courses, cemeteries and large institutions. There will also be a short-term rebate program to “provide monetary incentives for the replacement of inefficient household devices.”

It is important to note the inclusion of concerns for “degraded habitat for many fish and wildlife species, increase wildfire risk, and the threat of saltwater contamination to fresh water supplies in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Bay Delta” in his declaration. The Fresno Bee reported today that 50.2% of water use in California is by the environment, 40.9% by agriculture and 8.9% by residents and businesses. Although the 25% reduction is directed only at residential and business uses, water that goes to agriculture will now be closely monitored and evaluated for future plan making. This is an important step.

Everyone needs to use water wisely so that we may have enough water to drink, enough water for wildlife and their habitat, as well as enough to grow our food. The farmers in the Central Valley have already been hit hard with spartan allocations for the year. Produce prices will inevitably rise due to the higher cost of water, and the effect of the California drought will be felt across the country. It all comes down to the availability of water. Let’s all conserve. There is no more water, and what we have we are using up.

* Posted from San Francisco by Barbara Folger, NWNL Project Coordinator.

America’s energy leftovers makes its mark

September 19, 2014
USA:  Louisiana, New Orleans, Lower Mississippi River Basin, flight over coastal wetlands south of New Orleans, aerial view of barge carrying uncovered coal, spilling into the Mississippi River

USA: Louisiana, New Orleans, Lower Mississippi River Basin, flight over coastal wetlands south of New Orleans, aerial view of barge carrying uncovered coal, spilling into the Mississippi River

The world’s largest deposits of
“recoverable” coal are in the U.S.

Will we always be exporting coal?

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

We’re all connected downstream

April 4, 2014
USA:  New Jersey, Mountainville, Guinea Hollow Stream, early spring

USA: New Jersey, Mountainville, Guinea Hollow Stream, early spring

WHAT YOU CAN DO to protect our water resources:
Support the EPA and US Army Corps of Engineers –

It’s critical we all have clean fresh water! The EPA and USACE are proposing a clarification of their rules that protect our water quality by addressing upstream impacts on downstream communities. Ending loopholes in the 1970’s Clean Water Act will stop the free dumping of toxins into small streams and wetlands. This will affect some farmers’ use of pesticides and herbicides; but it will encourage restoration of riverine corridors and wetlands that filter such toxins. In the long-run, a tighter Clean Water Act will benefit us all.

NWNL asks everyone to jump in here!!

— Read the proposal.
— Listen to EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy on this ruling.
Contact the EPA during its 90-day Comment Period.

 

Water links us to our neighbor in a way more profound and complex than any other ~ John Thorson

December 17, 2013

THE WHITE NILE RIVER BASIN: One third of Africa’s populations reside in and depend on the natural resources of the Nile River Basin. The White Nile (2300 miles, 3700 km.) is punctuated by Lakes Victoria, Albert, Edward and Kyoga. Climate change, population growth, pollution and infrastructure are currently threatening the natural resources and balance of this watershed.

INDIVIDUAL and cooperative fishing, and water acquired via buckets and pumps, are the two traditional major uses of the Ugandan branches, tributaries and lakes in its White Nile River Basin. Today this watershed’s dramatic waterfalls challenge the adventurous rafters but are one by one being taken over to power hydro-electric dams. The No Water No Life March–April 2010 expedition to this region focused on the impacts of infrastructure projects such as these dams, limestone and oil mining, highway bridges, and Kampala hotels’ new golf courses.

NWNL documented issues including:

Forest and wetlands: The headwaters face deforestation, dam proposals and increasing settlement.

Lake Victoria: Pollution and invasive species threaten the livelihoods of 30 million lakeshore inhabitants.

Climate change: Increases in floods and droughts are greatly impacting this watershed.

View more photos from the expedition: http://nowater-nolife.org/expeditions/whitenile10/peopleUsing/index.html

 

Columbia River is one of the most hydro-dammed rivers in the world

December 3, 2013

The Columbia is one of the most hydro-dammed river basins in the world with some dams now over 70 years old. These dams change downstream water flows, and stop fish migrations. They are also buckling under decades of accumulated polluted sediment. The pressure is on for decommissioning many of these older dams, and 2 large ones on the Columbia have been removed recently – keeping the decades of that polluted sediment behind them from rushing downstream.

The Columbia is typical of many rivers that are heavily polluted by agriculture, industry, nuclear plants, livestock farms, and human waste. And now many of those pollutants are too deeply embedded for us to remove.

Nature could have done that clean-up job, but we’ve destroyed too many of the natural filters that would freely purify our dirty water: forest, wetlands, oysters…

A glimpse of life in the Omo River Basin

November 17, 2013
Ethiopia:  Omo River Basin, Kundama Farm, a Duss tribal farming community, irrigation canal © Alison M. Jones for www.nowater-nolife.org

Ethiopia: Omo River Basin, Kundama Farm, a Duss tribal farming community, irrigation canal © Alison M. Jones for http://www.nowater-nolife.org

View more images here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/amj-nwnl/sets/72157626365670325/

LAST CHANCE TO ENTER THE FUN!

November 1, 2013

THE TENNESSEE AND OHIO RIVER NO WATER NO LIFE EXPEDITION HAS JUST ENDED!

How many miles did Alison’s ’88 BMW (a.k.a. Black Beauty)
travel within the Tennessee and Ohio River Basins
during No Water No Life’s 5 week documentation of the
values and vulnerability of fresh water resources in
WV, VA, NC, TN, AL, MS, KY, IL, IN, OH, and PA?

It only costs $5 for each guess you submit!
Submit as many as you want! (Submit by Nov 8th!)

WINNER gets ¼ of the pot and a signed photo by Alison
Use Paypal or mail cash or check.
Include your mileage guess in an envelope or
e-mail to: alison@nowater-nolife.org

* Need a hint?
View the Expedition Itinerary.
View Distance Calculations below.

Check out photos from NWNL’s expedition on Instagram and Flickr!

Good Luck and Thank You for your support!

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 1.59.41 PM

New pix shared

October 29, 2013

Check out NWNL’s new photo gallery – Mara River Basin: Use and abuse of its water resources.

on the road / on the river

October 17, 2013
USA: Kentucky, Ohio and Tennessee River Confluence

USA: Kentucky, Ohio and Tennessee River Confluence

I started out thinking of America as highways and state lines. As I got to know it better, I began to think of it as rivers. Most of what I love about the country is a gift of the rivers. . . . America is a great story, and there is a river on every page of it.


~ Charles Kuralt, On the Road With Charles Kuralt

USA:  Louisiana, the Atchafalaya Basin, Morgan City waterfront seen from Berwick's Belleview Front Street, the Long-Allen Bridge, (aka "the old bridge" or The Atchafalaya Bridge used by LA 182 to cross the Atchafalaya River), and behind is the E.J. Lionel Grizzaffi Bridge (aka "the new bridge" for Interstate 90 to cross the Atchafalaya River)

USA: Louisiana, the Atchafalaya Basin, Morgan City waterfront seen from Berwick’s Belleview Front Street, the Long-Allen Bridge, (aka “the old bridge” or The Atchafalaya Bridge used by LA 182 to cross the Atchafalaya River), and behind is the E.J. Lionel Grizzaffi Bridge (aka “the new bridge” for Interstate 90 to cross the Atchafalaya River)

LOTTERY for our WATERSHEDS!

October 4, 2013

 

How many miles will Alison’s ’88 BMW (a.k.a. Black Beauty)
travel within the Tennessee and Ohio River Basins
so No Water No Life can document
values and vulnerability of fresh water resources of
WV, VA, TN, AL, MS, TN, KY, IL, IN, OH, and PA?

$5 per answer submitted!
WINNER gets ¼ of the pot and a signed photo by Alison
Use Paypal or mail cash or check.
Include your mileage guess in the envelope or
email to: alison@nowater-nolife.org

Make as many guesses as you want!

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 1.59.41 PM

View the Expedition’s Itinerary and Purpose.

Thank you for your support!

http://www.nowater-nolife.org

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