Posts Tagged ‘water issues’

Raritan River Week!

April 12, 2016
New Jersey, reflections of sycamore trees in Lamington River, tributary of Upper Raritan River

New Jersey, reflections of sycamore trees in Lamington River, tributary of Upper Raritan River

We love the Raritan River!

Celebrate RARITAN RIVER WEEK
April 16-30, 2016!

Check out the events page for rain barrel workshops, nature walks, stream cleanups, composting/gardening sessions and more for people of all ages to enjoy! There’s also a great list of resources for the region which includes maps of parks and protected areas, a book list, and lesson plans for teachers.

Did you know that there’s a Quarterly publication called Raritan too?Raritan offers writers and readers the opportunity for sustained reflection and aesthetic pleasure, uncluttered by academic jargon. Founded in 1981 by the distinguished literary critic Richard Poirier, and supported by Rutgers University, Raritan aims to reach the common reader in everyone and to provide a particular experience of reading, one that nurtures an engaged and questioning approach to cultural texts of all sorts: literary, artistic, political, historical, sociological, even scientific.”

USA: New Jersey, Raritan River Basin

USA: New Jersey, Raritan River Basin

The Raritan River We Know and Love

February 17, 2016

By Judy Shaw, Ph.D., Urban Environmental Planner,
Watershed Policy Coordinator, Author

The Raritan River, a long unsung treasure of New Jersey, was high on the list of special places for No Water No Life Founder and Director, Alison Jones. She lived in this NWNL case-study watershed all through her childhood and much of her adulthood. Thanks to documentary efforts by Alison and other Raritan stewards, the Raritan has risen in the esteem of many.

I had the pleasure of working with her and the many organizations that dedicate themselves to restoring and protecting this river. My recently-published book, The Raritan River: Our Landscape, Our Legacy, contains her images and those of many others who clearly love this river and this region.

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The book presents the story of key organizations and their leaders by region, so everyone can appreciate their hard work and dedication to the protection of the watershed. The beautiful banks of over 2000 miles of tributaries moved many area photographers and artists to capture its magical nature.

The book offers New Jersey people across the country to say, “Hey. This is the New Jersey we know and love. It’s more than a turnpike and heavy industry. It’s beautiful and it’s really special.”

USA: New Jersey, Mountainville, Upper Raritan River Basin, Tewksbury Township, spring blooms on hard wood tree, Saw Mill Rd.

Since I retired from Rutgers University in December as the Founding Director of the Edward J. Bloustein School’s Sustainable Raritan Initiative, I’ve had the pleasure of seeing the stewardship torch pass brightly on to the many who care as much as I did. So, get out and enjoy your natural treasures and capture the wonder in photos or paintings. You’ll be glad you did!

–Blog Post Written By Judy Shaw, NWNL Advisor

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We all live downstream

February 3, 2016
USA:  New Jersey, Lower Raritan River, NY/NJ Baykeeper headed downstream towards Middlesex County Landfill

USA: New Jersey, Lower Raritan River, NY/NJ Baykeeper headed downstream towards Middlesex County Landfill

 

USA: Washington, Palouse,  downstream of Little Goose Lock and Dam, USACE hydro and run-of-the-river dam on the Snake River

USA: Washington, Palouse, downstream of Little Goose Lock and Dam, USACE hydro and run-of-the-river dam on the Snake River

 

USA:  Mississippi, Natchez, downstream view of the Natchez MS-Vidalia LA bridge over the MIssissippi River

USA: Mississippi, Natchez, downstream view of the Natchez MS-Vidalia LA bridge over the MIssissippi River

Posted by Jasmine Graf, Associate Director of No Water No Life.

A Cinderella Story: Las Vegas isn’t a Water Hog

October 20, 2015
Nevada: Boulder City, river bed, Lake Mead National Recreation Area

Nevada: Boulder City, river bed, Lake Mead National Recreation Area

Mention of water usage in Las Vegas prompts most people to roll their eyes in exasperation. I saw this last week during a lecture on mega-droughts presented to an audience of environmentalists. Few realized that, rather than being the “ugly sister” of wise water consumption, Las Vegas – even with all casinos, glitz and fountains galore – is Cinderella’s fairy godmother waving a wand of solutions for arid communities.

This still-growing Nevada city is coping better than California with drought conditions, despite differences in the sources of their water supplies. Las Vegas draws from Lake Mead, the Colorado River reservoir dammed by Hoover Dam and known for the recreation it affords. California’s water users depend on aqueduct delivery of surface water (including the Colorado River) and groundwater reserves.   But, nevertheless, their droughts elicit the same fears of the economic consequences of not having enough water.

USA: Southern California, CA Drought Spotlight 3-Rte 66 Expedition, Parker Dam (hydrodam across Colorado River that also siphons water for Colorado Aquaduct to Los Angeles for Metropolitan Water District), signage

USA: Southern California, Parker Dam (hydrodam across Colorado River that siphons water for Colorado Aqueduct to Los Angeles via the Metropolitan Water District)

Californians – and all those never thought of Las Vegas as being an environmental trendsetter – would do well to take heed of what’s happening in Las Vegas. The Economist Magazine (August 8, 2015, p 23-24) neatly summarized the ways southern Nevada has preemptively and quite successfully addressed water availability issues.

Las Vegas has banned front lawns. Now xeri-scaping with cactus, yucca plants and interesting desert rocks has become fashionable.

USA California, Santa Barbara, Firescape Garden by firestation on Stanwood

Examples of xeri-scaping.

 

Las Vegas golf courses are now watered sparingly by “brown water.”  New dramatic views of desert scenery offer intriguing contrasts beyond the greens.

Example of a golf course with only greens irrigated.

A golf course after 4 years of drought with only its greens irrigated.

Facing the reality of desert resources, Las Vegas now treats and recycles water used in homes, pools and fountains back to Lake Mead. Furthermore, if homeowners use more than their allotted amounts of water (per a tiered scale), they are charged at higher rates. Yet California’s arcane regulations discourage and in some places dis-allows scaled water-pricing incentives so as to reduce water consumption.

Perhaps Las Vegas is ahead of California because the Colorado River Basin is entering its 16th year of drought and California is only in its 5th year of record-breaking drought. Things aren’t always what we think. Solutions can come from surprising sources.

El Nino, despite its attendant floods and mudslides, may replenish California’s surface water resources; but geology teaches us it will be many years or decades before its groundwater resources will be restored. Additionally, history teaches us that El Nino is often followed by that drought-maker, La Nina. So – as fairy tales teach us – the frog may become a prince and the casino’s scullery maid may become  stewardship’s “Belle of the Ball.” California, look towards Las Vegas!

USA: Southern California, road sign on local 15 on north side of Mohave River

USA: Southern California, road sign on local 15 on north side of Mohave River

For another comparison of  states’ differing management of groundwater and Colorado River water, read this blog post by Meg Wilcox (of Ceres) for National Geographic (Sept 25, 2015) on Arizona’s tight water management of large-scale vegetable farms versus that of California. Wilcox quotes one Arizona farmer as saying: “We track water like we do financial statements.”

Blog Post by Alison M. Jones, Director of No Water No Life.

Drought and Flooding increases CA Levees risk of failure

October 16, 2015
USA: California, Sherman Island, on north shore of Sacramento Delta, levee

California, Sherman Island, on north shore of Sacramento Delta, levee

Almost 5 years of drought, now combined with recent rainfall-induced flooding, has weakened California’s levees. Culprits are soil cracking that allows water seepage, soil-strength reduction, land subsidence and erosion, all of which NWNL observed on its California Spotlight expeditions in 2014 and 2015. Fifty-five percent of California’s levee systems are now in danger of failing in the event of a flood or an earthquake. If the levees fail, water quality could be compromised for over 23 million people.

Levees are sand and clay earthen embankments which regulate water levels and protect dry land from floods. More research, risk science, community education and stakeholder collaboration are crucial to improving levee resilience.

Related article in Science Magazine: https://grgusyd.files.wordpress.com/2015/08/vahedifard-et-al-2015_ca-drought-levees_science.pdf

USA: California, Arbuckle, irrigation drainage ditch, levee

California, Arbuckle, irrigation drainage ditch, levee

WATER is SHARED by ALL

March 31, 2015

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

NWNL Photo Exhibit, ‘Following Rivers’ opens @ BIRE March 14th

February 25, 2015
The Hudson River rises in pristine forests and enters tidal waters under heavily-trafficked urban bridges.  

The Hudson River rises in pristine forests and enters tidal waters under heavily-trafficked urban bridges.

On the banks of our rivers we raise families, grow food, do laundry, fish, swim, celebrate and relax. “Following Rivers,” a new exhibit by conservation photographer and No Water No Life Founding Director Alison M. Jones, tells a visual story of people and the critical water issues they face.

Combining the power of photography and science, NWNL, has spent 8 years documenting river basins in North America and Africa. The exhibit encourages viewers to translate images into questions. What are the impacts of our daily actions? How can we best protect our life-giving rivers and estuaries? Should we reduce resource consumption, require stronger pollution controls, minimize resource extraction, or forgo fossil fuels and material luxuries? How can we approach water as an opportunity for unity and cooperation, rather than a source of conflict?

Downstream impacts of new dams worry elders in Ethiopia’s Omo River Valley.

Downstream impacts of new dams worry elders in Ethiopia’s Omo River Valley.

NWNL believes the nexus of science and art, intellectual and physical resources, and local knowledge can effectively spread awareness of Nature’s unique interdependence and vulnerability of our watersheds’ glaciers, forests, wetlands, plains, estuaries, tributaries. Without raising that awareness, there will be no action.

The exhibit will be on view from March 14 through October 3, 2015.
Join us for a free public reception on Saturday, March 14 from 5-7 pm with Artists talks on April 11 and July 11, 2015 at Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries, Clarkson University, 199 Main Street, Beacon, NY 12508 – (845) 838-1600. Gallery Hours: Tu-Th 9-5, Fri 9-1 Sat 12-6 (second Sat until 8)  Sun/Mon-Closed

Learn More about No Water No Life.

This event is part of a global campaign, celebrating International Day of Actions for Rivers.

Rivers in Africa and N America support migrations, but are also clogged by invasive species.

Rivers in Africa and N America support migrations, but are also clogged by invasive species.

Will the movie “DamNation” lead to the removal of the lower four Snake River Dams?

February 24, 2015
USA: WA, Columbia Snake River Basin, Garfield Co., Lower Granite Dam

USA: WA, Columbia Snake River Basin, Garfield Co., Lower Granite Dam

Since the release of the movie “DamNation” over a year ago, over 72 dams have been removed and over 730 miles of rivers were restored across the United States according to the non-profit conservation organization American Rivers. In January of this year, the producers of the movie met with members of Congress and White House officials regarding the removal of the lower four Snake River dams. Lower Granite is one.

NWNL documented the Snake River on an expedition last May interviewing stakeholders of the river including local farmers, an irrigation association, members of the Nez Perce Tribe, the manager of the Port of Lewiston, Idaho Power spokespersons and conservation organizations. Each group presented what the importance of the Snake River is to them. The only stakeholders we could not interview are the 13 species of salmon, the lamprey, the whales and other ocean-going creatures as well as the riparian vegetation that depend on an abundance of salmon to thrive. They are also voices of the river. Will some or all of the lower four dams be removed?  Check out the facts and myths page on the website of Save Our Wild Salmon. Further information about DamNation and its influence on dam removal is also available.

Blog post and photo by Barbara Briggs Folger.

A Voice from the Mississippi River Delta

January 9, 2015

“No fishing. No gardening. No hunting. No land. No fresh water.” Jamie Dardar, in his 
Creole-Indian drawl, noted that below New Orleans, the Mississippi River’s delta is now
 losing one football field of land every hour. Maps are outdated with each wave.

In Jamie’s youth, gardens on Isle de Jean Charles spilled over with tomatoes, okra and
 vegetables galore. Fruit trees filled farmers’ bushel baskets. Wildlife, fish, crabs, shrimp 
and oysters provided the fare for feasts, sustenance and livelihoods.

As a young man Jamie left this paradise to drive 18-wheelers cross-country. But he
 quickly returned to the island’s bounty. Today he’s watching the sea-level rise and intense
 storms reduce his island to nothing. Land subsides as oil and gas extraction leave empty 
cavities. Abandoned drilling channels erode its shores. Oil spills and rusting rigs ruin local 
fisheries. Soil is too saline for crops or trees. From Minnesota on down,
 polluted waters pass dams and levees that retain floodplain sediment that could otherwise
 restore this delta.

The island’s residents now call their home “The Bathtub.” Jamie expects it will be under water 
in two years. He has re-applied to drive 18-wheelers along the Interstates.

“All I know is shrimping and changing gears.”

by Alison M. Jones, NWNL Director

USA:  Louisiana, Venice, Lower Mississippi River Basin, Gulf Coast, Mississippi River Delta, Pointe aux Chenes, shrimp fisherman's overalls hanging to dry

Mississippi River Delta, shrimp fisherman’s overalls hanging to dry

Watershed Education for ALL!

December 24, 2014

 IMAGINE… you can help NWNL encourage
grassroots awareness and action. Water issues
are people issues. 

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NWNL HAS REACHED OVER A MILLION PEOPLE with its documentation of watershed threats and solutions. NWNL social media attention is exploding: over 25,000 people viewed one NWNL image last week. Generous grants, gifts and in-kind donations totaling $900,000 have supported NWNL expeditions, educational outreach and information shared in many media these last 8 years.

NWNL needs your help in raising $50,000 to publish
our 8 years of documentation.

FISCAL SUPPORT for our WATERSHED EDUCATION for all
will help us compile and prepare print and video materials from our African and North American expeditions for publication.

YOUR SUPPORT WILL HELP US FUND:

  • Transcriptions of over 400 NWNL interviews for our new “Voices of the River” feature of inspirational stewardship and stories by scientists and stakeholders
  • Follow-up interviews with the key people working on new technologies and ground-breaking management approaches that offer global models of healthy watersheds
  • Targeted, on-the-spot documentation of critical developments unfolding in our 6 case-study watersheds
  • Publication in print and online on how freshwater availability and quality impacts each of us and our communities

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Please send the most generous gift you can to support
the NWNL commitment to clean freshwater.

Donations can be made via Pay Pal,
or checks made out to “No Water No Life”
(mail to Alison M. Jones,
No Water No Life,
330 East 79th Street,
New York, NY 10075).

THANK YOU and HAPPY HOLIDAYS
from the NWNL Team!

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