World Wetlands Day 2018

World Wetlands Day – February 2, 2018
blog by Sarah Kearns, NWNL Project Manager

BOT-OK-107.jpgOkavango Delta, Botswana, Africa

What are “wetlands”?

Synonyms: Marsh, fen, bog, pothole, mire, swamp, bottomlands, pond, wet meadows, muskeg, slough, floodplains, river overflow, mudflats, saltmarsh, sea grass beds, estuaries, and mangroves.

Jones_070605_BC_1624.jpgDevelopment on edge of Columbia Wetlands, British Columbia

Worldwide, wetlands regulate floods, filter water, recharge aquifers, provide habitat, store carbon, and inspire photographers & artists.

Jones_111024_LA_8655.jpgCyprus trees in Atchafalaya River Basin Wetlands, Louisiana

Wetlands control rain, snowmelt, and floodwater releases: mitigation that is more effective and less costly than man-made dams. Nearly 2 billion people live with high flood risk – This will increase as wetlands are lost or degraded.

Jones_091004_TZ_2124.jpgFishing boats among invasive water hyacinth in Lake Victoria, Tanzania

Wetlands absorb nitrogen and phosphorous which provides cleaner water downstream for drink water supplies, aquifers and reservoirs.

Jones_091002_TZ_1209.jpgWoman collecting water in Maseru Swamp, Tanzania

Wetlands absorb heat by day and release is at night, moderating local climates.

Jones_111021_LA_2490.jpgRed-earred turtles in Bluebonnet Swamp, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

We all need the clean air, water, and protection from flooding that wetland forests provide. But up to 80% of wetland forests in the US South have disappeared. What are our standing wetland forests worth? Let’s be sure we invest in our wetland forests. (From dogwoodalliance.org)  Worldwide, we must protect our wetlands.

Jones_150817_AZ_5849.jpgSouthern tip of Lake Havasu and incoming Williams River and its wetlands, Arizona

To learn more about World Wetlands day visit http://www.worldwetlandsday.org.

All photos © Alison M. Jones.

 

“They think we’re all gonna drown down here. But we ain’t going nowhere.” – Hushpuppy

Isle de Jean Charles

Isle de Jean Charles

NWNL is headed to the “Bathtub!” – The geographic inspiration for the movie, Beasts of the Southern Wild.” As director, Benh Zeitlin put it, “This is the edge of the world.”

Isle de Jean Charles is a sliver of marshland, deep in the bayous of Louisiana – also ground zero for climate change in the US. It is home to Native Americans that live off the land and water, a place of extraordinary biodiversity and beauty, but the Isle de Jean Charles is rapidly disappearing. The environment, history and culture of this coastal region is truly fascinating – Read more about it here.

Keep your fingers crossed that Island Rd ain’t flooded!

I’ll leave you with some Hushpuppy wisdom….

“Sometimes you can break something so bad, that it can’t get put back together.”

“The whole universe depends on everything fitting together just right. If one piece busts, even the smallest piece… the entire universe will get busted.”

“I see that I am a little piece of a big, big universe, and that makes it right.”

Crabbing on the causeway

Crabbing on the causeway

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Botswana’s Okavango Delta: UNESCO’s 1000th World Heritage Site!

A place as extraordinary as the Okavango Delta certainly deserves to be designated as a World Heritage Site – and finally it is!  As #1000 on that list, it’s one of NWNL’s favorite natural landscapes and wetlands ecosystem. You can see why in the photos. It’s literally an oasis in an arid country with no access to the sea. The Okavango River swells to three times its size during seasonal flooding, attracting one of Africa’s greatest concentrations of wildlife, including many endangered species. No Water – No Life!

Related reading: https://www.iucn.org/?16018/Iconic-Okavango-Delta-becomes-1000th-World-Heritage-site

http://www.okavangowildernessproject.org/

Put your swamp boots on! It’s World Wetlands Day!

World Wetlands Day is celebrated internationally on February 2nd. It marks the date of the Ramsar Convention of 1971.

Fun Fact: This year is the 40th anniversary of Australia’s Cobourg Peninsula being listed as the world’s first Wetland of International Importance under the Ramsar Convention.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director