I dream of rain, I dream of gardens in the desert sand – Desert Rose

Ethiopia, Omo River Valley, view of Omo River with desert rose
Ethiopia, Omo River Valley, view of Omo River with desert rose

“Water is the true wealth in a dry land.”

–U.S. author Wallance Stegner, Beyond the Hundredth Meridian

The Desert Rose is not a real rose, or a member of the rosaceae family, but a spectacular succulent! It is sometimes called the Elephant’s Foot because its trunks swell to store water from summer rains to last thru the long dry winters.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

A Desert Runs Through It – A Photographer’s View

By Alison M. Jones, Director of No Water No Life ® and Photographer
As published by American Rivers in “The River Blog” – April 9, 2014

On the seventh day of exploring impacts of drought in California’s Central Valley, I slipped down some loose scree into a San Joaquin riverbed.  Shadows of Mendota’s bridge on San Mateo Road were lengthening.  That early-evening hush of the desert was overtaking the power of the sun’s heat.  There was just enough light to photograph a snake-like bed of sand swallowing
the San Joaquin River.

Jones_140317_CA_0946Sierra Nevada Mountain glaciers no longer melt into the basin of California’s long-lost Corcoran Lake of 750,000 years ago. That vast inland sea spilled into the Pacific half a million years ago, but it left a rich legacy. Over the last 10,000 years glacial melt, winter rains, Sierra snow carved the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers and added further nutrients to one of the world’s most plentiful breadbaskets.

California, San Joaquin River National Wildlife Refuge
California, San Joaquin River National Wildlife Refuge

Those rivers flowed freely until 1919 when human engineers began redesigning California into a sprawling network of levees, aqueducts, canals, pumps, dams and reservoirs. Today, the Central Valley Project (1930) and State Water Project (1957) supplies water to 22 million Californians, irrigates 4 million acres, and provides hydro-electricity, flood control and recreation.  Built in 1941, Fresno’s Friant Dam irrigates over a million acres of farmland, but it leaves 60 miles of the San Joaquin River dry.

San Joaquin River Valley, ripples from striped bass in this remnant of San Joaquin River
San Joaquin River Valley, ripples from striped bass in this remnant of San Joaquin River

“Picture a river running through a desert.  Now picture a desert running through a river.”  I read that concept two days earlier at the Delta Visitor Center. It was now in my camera’s viewfinder.  Amidst a whine of mosquitos, I considered this crippled river, nature’s persistence versus man’s ingenuity, and how one balances nature’s productivity with human productivity.

Sudden splashes from behind were an alert that I’d hiked out alone from a dirt road.  But then I saw telltale stripes flashing and fish thrashing, framed by willow roots in shallow water.

USA: San Mateo Road crossing of San Joaquin River
USA: San Mateo Road crossing of San Joaquin River

There were four or five – maybe even seven – each at least 18 inches long. Flipping over each other, they fled my shadow into the far end of their stagnant puddle, leaving me with only ripples to photograph.  Striped bass, introduced to the California Delta in the 1800’s, are a saltwater species that seek freshwater for spawning.

Can they survive this three-year drought?  It’s unlikely there’ll be further significant rain this year, so human intervention would be needed. That’s not likely, given today’s unprecedented clamoring for water by municipalities and farmers.

There are, however, signs of hope.  In 2009, Friant Dam began  “restoration flows,” released by water users’ negotiated agreements.  In December 2013, National Marine Fisheries Service announced it might re-introduce spring Chinook salmon to the San Joaquin.  Salmon thrive in big, broad rivers, but struggle in drought and heat. However, restored flows and recognition of common interests, suggest that Chinook salmon may again reach the Sierra Nevadas.

CA, Central Valley, Delta Mendota Canal, part of State Water Project
CA, Central Valley, Delta Mendota Canal, part of State Water Project

American Rivers’ 2014 focus is on the San Joaquin River.  With their efforts, coordinated with other stakeholders, the San Joaquin River between Mendota and Fresno will hopefully become more than a fish trap in desert sand.

>>> TAKE ACTION! Tell Congress to protect water flows
in the San Joaquin.

Signs Along the Way

Here’s some of the signs we’ve come across during No Water No Life Expeditions over the years. Enjoy!

USA: Kentucky, Tennessee River Basin
USA: Kentucky, Tennessee River Basin
Kenya:  Mara River Basin, conservation sign in Mau Forest on Saosa River east of Kericho
Kenya: Mara River Basin, conservation sign in Mau Forest on Saosa River
USA: Tennessee River Basin, Chickamauga Dam owned by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)
USA: Tennessee River Basin, Chickamauga Dam owned by TVA
Kenya: Mara River Basin, Mulot
Kenya: Mara River Basin, Mulot
Kenya: Mara River Basin, Nairobi, pots of charcoal for sale for 30 Kenyan shillings each (50 US cents)
Kenya: Mara River Basin, Nairobi, pots of charcoal for sale for 30 Kenyan shillings each (50 US cents)
USA: Mississippi, Tennessee River Basin
USA: Mississippi, Tennessee River Basin
USA: Kentucky, Tennessee River Basin
USA: Kentucky, Tennessee River Basin

Posted in response to “A Word a Week” Challenge – Signs.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Put your swamp boots on! It’s World Wetlands Day!

World Wetlands Day is celebrated internationally on February 2nd. It marks the date of the Ramsar Convention of 1971.

Fun Fact: This year is the 40th anniversary of Australia’s Cobourg Peninsula being listed as the world’s first Wetland of International Importance under the Ramsar Convention.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Juxtapositions – industry vs. nature?

USA: Tennessee, Tennessee River Basin, Kingston, TVA's coal fly ash spill, Swan Pond Road
USA: Tennessee, Tennessee River Basin, Kingston, TVA’s coal fly ash spill, Swan Pond Road
USA:  Louisiana,  Atchafalaya Basin, Stephensville, discarded car tire in swamp with bits of invasive salvinia growing on it
USA: Louisiana, Atchafalaya Basin, Stephensville, discarded car tire in swamp with bits of invasive salvinia growing on it
USA:  Louisiana, Aerial photo of Atchafalaya Basin area, oil rigs in Cote Blanche Bay
USA: Louisiana, Aerial photo of Atchafalaya Basin area, oil rigs in Cote Blanche Bay

USA: West Virginia, Ohio River Basin, Huntington, parking lot

USA: Tennessee, Appalachia, Tennessee River Basin, Knoxville, fuel storage tanks on Tennessee River, sunset
USA: Tennessee, Appalachia, Tennessee River Basin, Knoxville, fuel storage tanks on Tennessee River, sunset

 

Selected juxtapositions from the Mississippi River Basin in response to the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Omo Valley Cultures in Ethiopia

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If man fails to honor the rivers,
he shall not gain life from them.

~ The Code of Hammurabi, 1760 BC

at the confluence

The travel theme this week on Ailsa’s blog is: Connections. NWNL decided to join in (pun intended)! These are expedition images of river confluences. Click on photos for detail and caption info.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director