Posts Tagged ‘photographs’

Finding Wetlands in a Drought

April 11, 2014
Lesser yellowlegs, San Luis NWR

Lesser yellowlegs, San Luis NWR

By Alison M. Jones, Director of No Water No Life ®
and Professional Photographer
As published by American Rivers in “The River Blog”-April 11, 2014

The phone rang.  That snowy Saturday I was editing photos of Ethiopia’s Omo River.  “Alison, you must cover California’s drought for No Water No Life®.  It’s beyond regional. US and Asian markets depend on that produce.” I envisioned photographs of a three-year drought:  monotones of white salt on sand.

San Joaquin River, Modesto

San Joaquin River, Modesto

Within 24 hours however, I connected California’s plight with our project’s case-study watersheds. Management solutions for California could help other watersheds. So, escaping an
unusually wet East Coast winter, I packed cameras and
sunglasses to document an arid valley 3,000 miles away. I didn’t expect to enjoy it.

On the plane, I read The Mountains of California written by John Muir 120 years ago.  “Every glacier in the world is smaller than it once was.  All the world is growing warmer….”1

What would he say today?  Surface area of Sierra Nevada glaciers
is 55% less,2 and development still increases along rivers below. Rivers? Oh, actually, the Central Valley now has fewer rivers and more canals.

Then unexpectedly, with expedition advice from American Rivers, my story grew beyond the desolation of drought to include hope.  Droughts come and go in California.  They may get worse.
But there are mitigating solutions. Restoration of streams,
riparian zones and wetlands matter as much as reduced
water consumption.

American Pelicans, Mendota Pool

American Pelicans, Mendota Pool

As American pelicans paddled through Mendota Pool, I read that wetlands hold 10 to 1,000 times the living matter in nearby dry land.  At dusk, a great-horned owl hunted above as I framed reflections in San Luis NWR.  What a relief from miles of empty concrete canals!  I thanked the sedge grasses rubbing my ankles for absorbing pollutants from nearby crop fields, hog farms and dairy-cattle pens.

Red-winged blackbird, San Luis NWR

Red-winged blackbird, San Luis NWR

An insect hatch sounded like rain on my windshield. I wished for higher levees to better view Pacific Flyway waterfowl in the bottomlands. Someday I hope to see Aleutian crackling geese and the tule elk now protected in San Joaquin NWR.

In 2006 Jared Diamond, Paul Ehrlich, Sandra Postel, Peter Raven, Edward O. Wilson et al. told the Supreme Court:  “More than a source of water and fish, the nation’s rivers, lakes, and wetlands store flood waters and reduce economic devastation due to flooding. They recharge groundwater, filter pollutants, and purify drinking water. And they provide the habitats that sustain a diversity of species, which themselves perform important ecological functions.”3

American egret, San Luis NWR

American egret, San Luis NWR

Despite such support, more than 90% of California’s historic riparian and wetlands habitats are gone (U.S. Fish and Wildlife). Today, the San Joaquin’s riparian habitat is scant.  But these traces of willows, shrubs and grasses support the highest diversity of wildlife in the Central Valley.   Wood ducks, river otters, warblers, eagles, spawning salmon and formerly California bear follow these wooded highways for safety, food and spawning.

Lesser scaup, California Aqueduct, Los Banos

Lesser scaup, California Aqueduct, Los Banos

The drought brought me here.  I saw trickles lead to less water, not more.  Nature seems turned inside out.  Yet American Rivers, other stewards, scientists, stakeholders and policymakers are working together to address needs of natural and human communities.  Just as John Muir wrote in 1885 about accumulating snowflakes in the Sierra, grassroots efforts can affect policy: “Come, we are feeble; let us help one another.  We are many, and together we will be strong.  Marching in close, deep ranks, let us … set the landscapes free.”4

Coots and Northern shovelers, San Luis NWR

Coots and Northern shovelers, San Luis NWR

——-

1 Muir, John.  The Mountains of California.  New York: Viking Penguin, Inc., 1985, Page 15.  (Originally published: New York: Century, 1894.)

2 Basagic, Hassan.  “Twentieth Century Glacier Change in the Sierra Nevada.”

3 Jason Rylander, et al. “Supreme Court Amici Curiae,” Nos 04-1034; 04-1384 regarding John A. Rapanos, et ux., et al., v. USA and June Carabell, et al., v. USACE and US EPA. Jan 12, 2006.

4 Muir, John.  The Mountains of California.  New York: Viking Penguin, Inc., 1985, Page 12.  (Originally published: New York: Century, 1894.)

at the confluence

November 8, 2013

The travel theme this week on Ailsa’s blog is: Connections. NWNL decided to join in (pun intended)! These are expedition images of river confluences. Click on photos for detail and caption info.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

New web gallery of Pokot Land and People

August 21, 2013
Africa:  Kenya, North Rift District, young Pokot man ("moran")  at market on edge of the Nakuru-Sigor Road (B-4)

Africa: Kenya, North Rift District, young Pokot man (“moran”) at market on edge of the Nakuru-Sigor Road (B-4)

Upstream dams on the Omo River continue to put pressure on the northern Kenyan Pokot and Turkana tribes, who have been fighting for generations over diminishing resources, water access, grazing lands, and livestock.

On a recent expedition, No Water No Life documented alternative options for the local indigenous pastoralists and fishermen. Development projects included bee-keeping for many honey products, camel husbandry as a more drought-appropriate replacement for cattle and goats, and wild silk production from moths on local acacia. CABESI’s “Kitchen Without Borders” is an initiative to foster peaceful relations between indigenous tribes in the region. It’s main focus is to utilize natural resources to benefit the local community.

Check out NWNL photos of the Pokot Land and People Kenya’s Lake Turkana region.

These photos were taken on No Water No Life’s Omo River Basin Expedition in January of 2013.

All images © Alison M. Jones for http://www.nowater-nolife.org

For more details, read the Purpose and Itinerary.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

NWNL Holiday Wish: Peace and Clean Water for All!

December 26, 2012

wetlandsNWNL has completed 15 expeditions – and now have only 5 left!

We’ve shared our watershed documentation with over 1,000,000 adults and 1000’s of students. We’ve received numerous significant awards and honors. Read our NWNL Progress 2007–2012 outlining our identification of watershed challenges and investigation of sustainable solutions.
The sooner we finish our fieldwork, the sooner we can reach wider audiences. So I’ve written a Letter to all Watershed Stakeholders – that’s all of you! – asking for funds to help us create a world with “Peace and Clean Water for All!

Happy New Year!
Alison M. Jones, Director of NWNL

Jones_111101_LA_4459For gifts under $100 (no tax-deduction): write check to No Water No Life or use PayPal on our site.
For tax-deductible gifts of $100 or more: write check to: No Water No Life/WINGS World Quest.

Mail checks to Alison M. Jones, 330 E 79th St, New York, NY 10075.
Like last year, all donors of $100 or more will receive one of my favorite NWNL photographs!

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