Posts Tagged ‘NWNL–Omo River Basin’

Please LIKE our photo on FB in a Biodiversity Int’l photo contest!

July 22, 2015

Please LIKE our photo on FB in a Biodiversity Int’l photo contest!
It shows a reason for hope that the 300 thousand people who depend on Lake Turkana will not resort to conflict as they watch their lake disappear…

Bottle-top checkers at Kitchen Without Borders / The Omo Delta flowing into Lake Turkana

Bottle-top checkers at Kitchen Without Borders / The Omo Delta flowing into Lake Turkana

Negotiating environmental justice
Can international attention halt dam projects?
As Ethiopia’s Omo River is depleted by new dams and large ag biz, the water level of Kenya’s Lake Turkana, the river’s terminus, is under grave threat. Thus strife will increase among Lake Turkana residents, making efforts such as “Kitchen Without Borders” even more important!

In 2013, No Water No Life visited Cabesi and spoke with founder, Rolf Gloor, who said “If people can sit down to eat together, peace will come.”

Find out more
Read a recent Nat Geo article (Aug 2015) for stories about the threats to Lake Turkana, Africa’s largest desert lake.
Watch a video by International Rivers about the hydrological impacts of dam projects in the region.
CABESI is a project offering alternative livelihoods to pastoralists who find their old traditions must adapt to future needs and climatic situations.
Kitchen Without Borders encourages peaceful experiences and dialogue amongst rival tribes in conflict over water rights.

The Value of Water in a dry land – Photos from the Omo River Basin

October 24, 2014
Africa:  Kenya; Pokot Land, Orwa, CABESI Kitchen without Borders project, vegetable garden plot, seedlings

Africa: Kenya; Pokot Land, Orwa, CABESI Kitchen without Borders project, vegetable garden plot, seedlings

 

Ethiopia: Kundama Farm, a Duss tribal farming community, a 2-day-old Karo baby with its mother

Ethiopia: Kundama Farm, a Duss tribal farming community, a 2-day-old Karo baby with its mother

 

Ethiopia:  Omo Delta at low water stage, herders lead cattle to water

Ethiopia: Omo Delta at low water stage, herders lead cattle to water

 

Africa:  Kenya; Turkana Land, man pushing cart of gerry cans to be filled with water from the river outside of town

Africa: Kenya; Turkana Land, man pushing cart of gerry cans to be filled with water from the river outside of town

 

Africa:  Kenya; Karakol, dried tilapia headed to markets in Kisimu, Nairobi and elsewhere

Africa: Kenya; Karakol, dried tilapia headed to markets in Kisimu, Nairobi and elsewhere

 

Ethiopia:  Omo Delta, Dassenech village of Ilokelete, in low water season, woman carrying fodder for goats

Ethiopia: Omo Delta, Dassenech village of Ilokelete, in low water season, woman carrying fodder for goats

 

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

On the banks of the Omo River

June 11, 2014
Ethiopia:  Omo River Basin, Karo tribal farm (with irrigation) called Kundama, young girl displaying 3 catfish just caught, standing against field of sorghum

Ethiopia: Omo River Basin, Karo tribal farm (with irrigation) called Kundama, young girl displaying 3 catfish just caught, standing against field of sorghum

Ethiopia:  Lower Omo River Basin, Lebuk, a Karo village, dance ceremony

Ethiopia: Lower Omo River Basin, Lebuk, a Karo village, dance ceremony

Ethiopia: Omo Valley, Karo painting, bird's eye view of Omo River, trees, snake, chicken, jug of water

Ethiopia: Omo Valley, Karo painting, bird’s eye view of Omo River, trees, snake, chicken, jug of water

These photos were selected in response to a weekly photo challenge – the theme is HAPPY.

Click here to view more images of Omo Valley cultures in Ethiopia.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

March 5, 2014

“Do unto those downstream as you would have those upstream do unto you.” ― Wendell Berry

Read a related article: The Race to Save Ethiopians Damned by the Dam, by Al Mariam  

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Ethiopia: Dams threaten Indigenous communities, Omo Valley, Lake Turkana

February 21, 2014

A Cascade of Development on the Omo River by International Rivers, with photos by Alison M. Jones, 2014 (11:19).

This film outlines how Ethiopia’s new Gibe Dams will cause a 70% water-level reduction over the next 3 years – and thus drastically impact Ethiopia’s Omo River, its Lake Turkana terminus in Kenya, and ½ million residents in this Rift Valley’s Cradle of Humankind. These hydro-dams – and the new commercial agricultural plantations they will irrigate – threaten the livelihoods of local indigenous tribes and their ecosystems. The Gibe Dams will also imperil the Omo-Turkana Basin’s migrating birds, fish and crocodile populations, and the scant amount of wildlife left.

The film pleads that water flows be managed so as to maintain the sustainability of the Omo River, Lake Turkana, and today’s indigenous communities who represent 6000 years of self-sustaining flood-recession farmers and fishermen. For more information on the Omo River :
 Download the factsheet on Gibe III Dam by International Rivers.

ADDITIONAL THOUGHTS FROM NWNL:  For many millennia, the Omo’s annual 60 foot floods from the highlands’ monsoonal rains have supplied nutrient-rich silt and irrigation for the crops of the Mursi, Suri, Karo, Hamar, Nyangatom, Dassanech and other
unique indigenous cultures. In a 2008 NWNL interview…. Read the full story here.

A glimpse of life in the Omo River Basin

November 17, 2013
Ethiopia:  Omo River Basin, Kundama Farm, a Duss tribal farming community, irrigation canal © Alison M. Jones for www.nowater-nolife.org

Ethiopia: Omo River Basin, Kundama Farm, a Duss tribal farming community, irrigation canal © Alison M. Jones for http://www.nowater-nolife.org

View more images here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/amj-nwnl/sets/72157626365670325/

Omo Valley Cultures in Ethiopia

November 13, 2013

Screen Shot 2013-11-13 at 6.18.23 PM

If man fails to honor the rivers,
he shall not gain life from them.

~ The Code of Hammurabi, 1760 BC

beautiful painted faces in the spirit of Halloween

October 30, 2013

New web gallery of Pokot Land and People

August 21, 2013
Africa:  Kenya, North Rift District, young Pokot man ("moran")  at market on edge of the Nakuru-Sigor Road (B-4)

Africa: Kenya, North Rift District, young Pokot man (“moran”) at market on edge of the Nakuru-Sigor Road (B-4)

Upstream dams on the Omo River continue to put pressure on the northern Kenyan Pokot and Turkana tribes, who have been fighting for generations over diminishing resources, water access, grazing lands, and livestock.

On a recent expedition, No Water No Life documented alternative options for the local indigenous pastoralists and fishermen. Development projects included bee-keeping for many honey products, camel husbandry as a more drought-appropriate replacement for cattle and goats, and wild silk production from moths on local acacia. CABESI’s “Kitchen Without Borders” is an initiative to foster peaceful relations between indigenous tribes in the region. It’s main focus is to utilize natural resources to benefit the local community.

Check out NWNL photos of the Pokot Land and People Kenya’s Lake Turkana region.

These photos were taken on No Water No Life’s Omo River Basin Expedition in January of 2013.

All images © Alison M. Jones for http://www.nowater-nolife.org

For more details, read the Purpose and Itinerary.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Peace in Kenyan Watersheds

March 5, 2013
mural on bldg.
The juxtaposition of posters in Kenya last month showing movie violence and election candidates mirrors the country’s past pattern of violence during elections.
Pokot woman
This Pokot woman has placed a beaded version of the Kenyan flag on top of her traditional tribal garb to emphasize her wish that Kenyans unite together in peace.

YESTERDAY 70% of Kenya went to the polls to vote for their new governors and next president, undaunted by blazing heat, long lines and nagging memories of the election violence Kenyans suffered 5 years ago. As I write this, only 40% of the votes have been counted and thus the winners are uncertain and violence could still be a sad outcome if results are disputed.

What is certain is that the last 5 years have prompted many efforts by Kenyans to move past their history of ethnic strife and become a country of diversity that honors peace. So many people I’ve met in Kenya over the last 5 years are now calling themselves “Kenyans” first and only later mentioning their tribal affiliation.

flag on tree
New peace effort to bring rivals together over a meal.

One such effort, witnessed in January this year by team members of the NWNL Lake Turkana Expedition, is the opening of a “Kitchen Without Borders” on the boundary of Turkana and Pokot Lands. Kitchen Without Borders, or “Cuisine Sans Frontieres,” is a global effort begun in Switzerland to encourage warring clans to begin the process of peace by simply sitting down together to eat.

cattle herder
A Pokot herder walks his herd towards Marich Pass.

The northern Kenyan Pokot and Turkana tribes, like too many others in Kenya and neighboring Sudan and Ethiopia, have been fighting for generations over grazing lands, livestock, water access and retribution for past offenses. The problem is obvious when one learns that the literal derivation of the word “rival” is “the person who wants access to the same water resource you use.”

checkers game
These Pokot are playing checkers with beer bottle tops.

In Orwa, on the road between Kapenguria (Pokot Country) and Lodwar (Turkana Country), a restaurant called “Calabash” has opened for local travelers, offering local food (much of which comes from their backyard garden), drink, lodging – or just a friendly game of checkers.

children
Playing fairly with others in games, as in life, is a skill to be learned while young.

At this roadside oasis, elders teach their youngsters how to play the traditional game of “bao,” in which each stone captured on the board represents the acquisition of a cow. Hopefully old animosities will be unknown by these children; just as Kenyans today are hoping the past atrocities that accompanied their elections are now past history.

children
Shared relaxation between Kenyans of all tribes is a good first step in national unity and progress.

The Orwa peace effort, similar to other Kitchens Without Borders in South America, represents nothing political. Kenya’s Kitchens without Borders offers a low-key opportunity to share the daily basics of life for an afternoon. Sitting down for a meal and sharing some quiet moments offers a break from the dusty road. It’s a chance to relax and meet others who share the same road.

Those visionaries, who have created this roadside respite of camaraderie as an escape from anger and bitterness, cheerfully hand out ripe mangoes to all who pass by – as well as best wishes for one’s journey.

“If people can sit down to eat together, peace will come,” according to Rolf Gloor, our host in Kapenguria and founder of CABESI, a project offering alternative livelihoods to pastoralists who find their old traditions must adapt to future needs and climatic situations.

man with mangoes
The hope is that a welcome gift of mangoes can disarm AK-47s.
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