The Value of Water in a dry land – Photos from the Omo River Basin

Africa:  Kenya; Pokot Land, Orwa, CABESI Kitchen without Borders project, vegetable garden plot, seedlings
Africa: Kenya; Pokot Land, Orwa, CABESI Kitchen without Borders project, vegetable garden plot, seedlings

 

Ethiopia: Kundama Farm, a Duss tribal farming community, a 2-day-old Karo baby with its mother
Ethiopia: Kundama Farm, a Duss tribal farming community, a 2-day-old Karo baby with its mother

 

Ethiopia:  Omo Delta at low water stage, herders lead cattle to water
Ethiopia: Omo Delta at low water stage, herders lead cattle to water

 

Africa:  Kenya; Turkana Land, man pushing cart of gerry cans to be filled with water from the river outside of town
Africa: Kenya; Turkana Land, man pushing cart of gerry cans to be filled with water from the river outside of town

 

Africa:  Kenya; Karakol, dried tilapia headed to markets in Kisimu, Nairobi and elsewhere
Africa: Kenya; Karakol, dried tilapia headed to markets in Kisimu, Nairobi and elsewhere

 

Ethiopia:  Omo Delta, Dassenech village of Ilokelete, in low water season, woman carrying fodder for goats
Ethiopia: Omo Delta, Dassenech village of Ilokelete, in low water season, woman carrying fodder for goats

 

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

NWNL at the Columbia River Basin 2014 Transboundary Conference

CRB-conf-poster

Thru talks and art journaling, Day 1 of this conference has imparted a sense of how more and more of the diverse stakeholders in this basin are learning to “think like a river” — if the fish and other species don’t recognize boundaries, neither should humans!

diverse-groupCRB

The Arkansas Delta

Waves on the Mississippi
Waves on the Mississippi
Birds in trees in river
Birds in trees in river

The Mississippi, Arkansas and White Rivers irrigate the flat, fertile lands of the Arkansas Delta, as do the many tributaries, bayous and irrigation ditches. Either muddy water or sandy, dry soil is underfoot – nothing in between. But it is the mix of the two that yields the state’s renowned crops of cotton, soy, corn, wheat and rice that is barged throughout the nation – and the world, thanks to the navigation channels of the Mississippi and its tributaries.

Throughout the month of September NWNL will be visiting the Lower Mississippi River Basin and tributaries with a focus on urban and rural resiliency to climate change. Read more about this Lower Mississippi expedition and see more NWNL photos from the Louisiana segment of this expedition depicting Isle de Jean Charles and Parish of St. John the Baptist.

NWNL will be posting more photos from this expedition in the coming weeks on nowater-nolife.org.

Fishing on the Arkansas River
Fishing on the Arkansas River
Cotton field
Cotton field

America’s energy leftovers makes its mark

USA:  Louisiana, New Orleans, Lower Mississippi River Basin, flight over coastal wetlands south of New Orleans, aerial view of barge carrying uncovered coal, spilling into the Mississippi River
USA: Louisiana, New Orleans, Lower Mississippi River Basin, flight over coastal wetlands south of New Orleans, aerial view of barge carrying uncovered coal, spilling into the Mississippi River

The world’s largest deposits of
“recoverable” coal are in the U.S.

Will we always be exporting coal?

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Coal exports threaten human health, aquatic life and degrade natural resources

USACE is pulling out of its study of the coal terminal in Portland, Oregon since tribal fishing rights are stopping the process. This is great news, as the Columbia Riverkeeper notes, for the health of the anadromous fish populations as well as human communities in the Lower Columbia River Basin.

But this news puts more pressure on a proposal for a new international coal terminal at the end of the Mississippi River in its Delta where air and water pollution from coal already being exported degrades the lives of those nearby. Unfortunately, Louisiana is one of the states that doesn’t require coal cars or coal piles to be covered. Thus wind blows coal ash off open train cars, conveyer belts and large storage piles in all directions. The levees around the stored piles waiting for transfer onto barges are low and simple earthen structures that are easily breached in big storms….

There are many fewer people to be affected in the Mississippi Delta than in Portland and surrounding communities on the Columbia. So, it’s not likely there can be the coordinated, strong protest that has been ongoing in the Columbia River Basin. Nor are there tribal fishing rights that stand up in court. In the Mississippi River Delta it falls to local shrimpers and oyster fishermen to prove that coal ash in the water affects the health of the fin fish and shellfish populations.

Interesting how what happens in one NWNL watershed affects and relates to another.

USA:  Louisiana, New Orleans, Lower Mississippi River Basin, Gulf Coast, Mississippi River Delta, coal being prepared for export
USA: Louisiana, New Orleans, Lower Mississippi River Basin, Gulf Coast, Mississippi River Delta, coal being prepared for export

 

Botswana’s Okavango Delta: UNESCO’s 1000th World Heritage Site!

A place as extraordinary as the Okavango Delta certainly deserves to be designated as a World Heritage Site – and finally it is!  As #1000 on that list, it’s one of NWNL’s favorite natural landscapes and wetlands ecosystem. You can see why in the photos. It’s literally an oasis in an arid country with no access to the sea. The Okavango River swells to three times its size during seasonal flooding, attracting one of Africa’s greatest concentrations of wildlife, including many endangered species. No Water – No Life!

Related reading: https://www.iucn.org/?16018/Iconic-Okavango-Delta-becomes-1000th-World-Heritage-site

http://www.okavangowildernessproject.org/

Earth Day Symposium on Awareness of Water Usage

Water Symposium panelists L-R: Karl Weber, Alison Jones, Alex Prud'homme, Nicholas Robinson, John Cronin
Water Symposium panelists L-R: Karl Weber, Alison Jones, Alex Prud’homme, Nicholas Robinson, John Cronin, Photo by Sang Bae

“No resource on earth is more precious—or more endangered—than water.”  – Last Call at the Oasis

“It’s too late for pessimism.”  – Alison M. Jones

Yesterday, Alison M. Jones (Director of No Water No Life and Conservation Photographer) was one of the panelists at Earth Day’s “Water Symposium” at The Masters School in Dobbs Ferry, NY. Other panelists included John Cronin (author of The Riverkeepers and Beacon Institute Fellow at Clarkson University); Alex Prud’homme (author of The Ripple Effect: The Fate of Fresh Water in the Twenty-First Century and Hydrofracking: What Everyone Needs to Know); Karl Weber (editor of companion book to the film, Last Call at the Oasis: The Global Water Crisis and Where We Go From Here) and Nicholas A. Robinson (Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law at Pace University).