Posts Tagged ‘Native American tribes’

“They think we’re all gonna drown down here. But we ain’t going nowhere.” – Hushpuppy

September 9, 2014
Isle de Jean Charles

Isle de Jean Charles

NWNL is headed to the “Bathtub!” – The geographic inspiration for the movie, Beasts of the Southern Wild.” As director, Benh Zeitlin put it, “This is the edge of the world.”

Isle de Jean Charles is a sliver of marshland, deep in the bayous of Louisiana – also ground zero for climate change in the US. It is home to Native Americans that live off the land and water, a place of extraordinary biodiversity and beauty, but the Isle de Jean Charles is rapidly disappearing. The environment, history and culture of this coastal region is truly fascinating – Read more about it here.

Keep your fingers crossed that Island Rd ain’t flooded!

I’ll leave you with some Hushpuppy wisdom….

“Sometimes you can break something so bad, that it can’t get put back together.”

“The whole universe depends on everything fitting together just right. If one piece busts, even the smallest piece… the entire universe will get busted.”

“I see that I am a little piece of a big, big universe, and that makes it right.”

Crabbing on the causeway

Crabbing on the causeway

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

NWNL Interview with Ray Gardner featured in Terralingua Langscape

February 12, 2014

Screen Shot 2014-02-12 at 4.32.58 PM

NWNL’s Alison M. Jones interviewed Ray Gardner, Chairman of the five tribes of the Chinook Nation, in June 2007. The interview describes the historic ties the Chinook people have had with the Columbia River, their practices to keep the river healthy, and effects of dams and other infrastructure placed along our rivers. You can read the interview here.

Terralingua featured the interview in their Winter 2013 issue of Langscape, pages 54–57.

Full Wolf Moon Tonite! – HOWL!

January 15, 2014
USA:  Montana, Bozeman, "Cheyenne," rescued Grey wolf (Canis lupus)

USA: Montana, Bozeman, “Cheyenne,” rescued Grey wolf (Canis lupus)

Tonight’s full moon is known as the Full Wolf Moon. This name dates back to Native American tribes in the Northern and Eastern United States. According to the Farmer’s Almanac, “Amid the cold and deep snows of midwinter, the wolf packs howled…”

The wolf is a keystone species in our watersheds. This oft-maligned canine plays a critical role in naturally balancing water quantity in upper and lower river basins. Visiting the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem in 2008, No Water No Life witnessed wolves protecting our water supplies and preventing downstream destruction and degradation in the Missouri-Mississippi watersheds.

The presence of wolves along riverbanks keeps heavy browsers (such as elk and moose) back in the cover of forests. But – without the wolf, riverside vegetation is quickly devoured. Without bushes, sedges and grasses, riverbanks quickly destabilize and erode. Without riverine willows, beavers can’t build dams. Without beaver dams and riverside vegetation, nature’s moderating water–retention system becomes ineffective. All these changes exacerbate the increase in floods and droughts downstream these days.

Let’s take advantage of nature’s free gift of wolves and howl with them in the full moon tonight!!!

%d bloggers like this: