A Watershed Thankful List

All photos © Alison M. Jones For 12 years, NWNL has documented six case-studies in North America and Eastern Africa – as well as a Spotlight on the ongoing 7-year California Drought. Thus, this week we want to share our appreciation of nature’s miracles and human stewardship in these special watersheds! NWNL says THANK YOU for … Continue reading A Watershed Thankful List

Papyrus and Phragmites: Invasive Species

By Bianca T. Esposito, NWNL Research Intern (Edited by Alison M.  Jones, NWNL Director) NWNL research intern Bianca T. Esposito is a senior at Syracuse University studying Biology and Economics. Her research this summer is on the nexus of biodiversity and water resources. Her earlier NWNL blogs were: Wild Salmon v Hatchery Salmon and Buffalo, … Continue reading Papyrus and Phragmites: Invasive Species

Cape Buffalo, Bison and Water

By Bianca T. Esposito, NWNL Research Intern (Edited by Alison M.  Jones, NWNL Director) NWNL research intern Bianca T. Esposito is a senior at Syracuse University studying Biology and minoring in Economics. Her research this summer is on the intertwined relationships of biodiversity and our water resources. This is Bianca's second blog on Biodiversity for NWNL. … Continue reading Cape Buffalo, Bison and Water

NWNL “Pool of Books” 2017

NWNL has compiled a list of new and old favorite books about water issues and our case-study watersheds for your reference for gifts and for the New Year. Many of the authors and publishers are personal friends of NWNL. All of them are worth reading. The links provided below go to Amazon Smile, where a … Continue reading NWNL “Pool of Books” 2017

World Conservation Day 2017

In honor of World Conservation Day, NWNL wants to share some of it's favorite photographs from over the years of each of our case-study watersheds. Trout Lake in the Columbia River Basin   Aerial view of the largest tributary of the Lower Omo River   Canoeing on the Mississippi River   Fisherman with his canoe … Continue reading World Conservation Day 2017

Just So We Can Survive, We Must Change….

Rudyard Kipling’s Just So Stories charmed Victorian readers with tales such as how the leopard got his spots. In re-reading this childhood classic, I was struck with the idea of Kipling’s whimsy being a parable for climate change adaptation and coping techniques. So… Adaptation in the Mara River Basin paired with Kipling’s Words “There was … Continue reading Just So We Can Survive, We Must Change….

Even invasive species can be beautiful

Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) is one of the world's worst aquatic weeds. It is characterized by rapid growth rate, extensive reproductive output and broad environmental resistance. It creates dense mats of vegetation that restrict oxygen in water, causing deterioration in water quality, fish mortality and declining biodiversity. A healthy acre of the plant can weigh … Continue reading Even invasive species can be beautiful