Posts Tagged ‘landscape’

Textures of the Natural World

January 20, 2016

If alphabets represent the sounds of language, can texture articulate the harmonies of nature?

ARG Valdes Peninsula, Argentina:  Valdes Peninsula, Patagonia, Chubut Province, Punta Norte, beach on Atlantic Ocean, white seaweed on pebbles

View more textures of nature in our Flickr album!

Posted in response to “Alphabet” – Word a Week Photo Challenge.

Posted by Jasmine Graf, Associate Director of No Water No Life.

A Cinderella Story: Las Vegas isn’t a Water Hog

October 20, 2015
Nevada: Boulder City, river bed, Lake Mead National Recreation Area

Nevada: Boulder City, river bed, Lake Mead National Recreation Area

Mention of water usage in Las Vegas prompts most people to roll their eyes in exasperation. I saw this last week during a lecture on mega-droughts presented to an audience of environmentalists. Few realized that, rather than being the “ugly sister” of wise water consumption, Las Vegas – even with all casinos, glitz and fountains galore – is Cinderella’s fairy godmother waving a wand of solutions for arid communities.

This still-growing Nevada city is coping better than California with drought conditions, despite differences in the sources of their water supplies. Las Vegas draws from Lake Mead, the Colorado River reservoir dammed by Hoover Dam and known for the recreation it affords. California’s water users depend on aqueduct delivery of surface water (including the Colorado River) and groundwater reserves.   But, nevertheless, their droughts elicit the same fears of the economic consequences of not having enough water.

USA: Southern California, CA Drought Spotlight 3-Rte 66 Expedition, Parker Dam (hydrodam across Colorado River that also siphons water for Colorado Aquaduct to Los Angeles for Metropolitan Water District), signage

USA: Southern California, Parker Dam (hydrodam across Colorado River that siphons water for Colorado Aqueduct to Los Angeles via the Metropolitan Water District)

Californians – and all those never thought of Las Vegas as being an environmental trendsetter – would do well to take heed of what’s happening in Las Vegas. The Economist Magazine (August 8, 2015, p 23-24) neatly summarized the ways southern Nevada has preemptively and quite successfully addressed water availability issues.

Las Vegas has banned front lawns. Now xeri-scaping with cactus, yucca plants and interesting desert rocks has become fashionable.

USA California, Santa Barbara, Firescape Garden by firestation on Stanwood

Examples of xeri-scaping.

 

Las Vegas golf courses are now watered sparingly by “brown water.”  New dramatic views of desert scenery offer intriguing contrasts beyond the greens.

Example of a golf course with only greens irrigated.

A golf course after 4 years of drought with only its greens irrigated.

Facing the reality of desert resources, Las Vegas now treats and recycles water used in homes, pools and fountains back to Lake Mead. Furthermore, if homeowners use more than their allotted amounts of water (per a tiered scale), they are charged at higher rates. Yet California’s arcane regulations discourage and in some places dis-allows scaled water-pricing incentives so as to reduce water consumption.

Perhaps Las Vegas is ahead of California because the Colorado River Basin is entering its 16th year of drought and California is only in its 5th year of record-breaking drought. Things aren’t always what we think. Solutions can come from surprising sources.

El Nino, despite its attendant floods and mudslides, may replenish California’s surface water resources; but geology teaches us it will be many years or decades before its groundwater resources will be restored. Additionally, history teaches us that El Nino is often followed by that drought-maker, La Nina. So – as fairy tales teach us – the frog may become a prince and the casino’s scullery maid may become  stewardship’s “Belle of the Ball.” California, look towards Las Vegas!

USA: Southern California, road sign on local 15 on north side of Mohave River

USA: Southern California, road sign on local 15 on north side of Mohave River

For another comparison of  states’ differing management of groundwater and Colorado River water, read this blog post by Meg Wilcox (of Ceres) for National Geographic (Sept 25, 2015) on Arizona’s tight water management of large-scale vegetable farms versus that of California. Wilcox quotes one Arizona farmer as saying: “We track water like we do financial statements.”

Blog Post by Alison M. Jones, Director of No Water No Life.

After all, aren’t clouds just recycled water?

July 29, 2014
Kenya: Trees clouds landscape

Kenya: Trees clouds landscape

Tanzania:  Zanzibar, Indian Ocean and cumulus cloud, sunset

Tanzania: Zanzibar, Indian Ocean and cumulus cloud, sunset

California: Yosemite National Park, Half Dome at sunset

California: Yosemite National Park, Half Dome at sunset

Tanzania:  Zanzibar, Indian Ocean and local fishing boat

Tanzania: Zanzibar, Indian Ocean and local fishing boat

What’s the WATER CYCLE?

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

June 13, 2014
US: Oregon, Columbia River Basin, foxglove

US: Oregon, Columbia River Basin, foxglove

In all things of nature there is
something of the marvelous. -Aristotle

April 16, 2014
USA: Iowa, Upper Mississippi River Basin, Cedar Falls, Prairie preserved by University of Southern Idaho

USA: Iowa, Upper Mississippi River Basin, Cedar Falls, Prairie preserved by University of Southern Idaho

Weekly Photo Challenge: Grand

December 11, 2013
California: Death Valley National Park, view from Zabriskie Point with tourist enjoying overlook, January.

California: Death Valley National Park, view from Zabriskie Point with tourist enjoying overlook, January.

No Water No Life’s photo pick in response to The Daily Post’s Blog –  Weekly Photo Challenge: Grand.

at the confluence

November 8, 2013

The travel theme this week on Ailsa’s blog is: Connections. NWNL decided to join in (pun intended)! These are expedition images of river confluences. Click on photos for detail and caption info.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

On top of old Smoky…

October 2, 2013
Elevation 5046' - Smoky Mountain N P  - NWNL Mississippi River Basin expedition 2013

NWNL Mississippi River Basin Expedition 2013 – Smoky Mountain National Park, Elevation 5046′

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