Glaciers – Butterflies – Change

All photos © Alison M. Jones Rivers are like sentences. They run on. There is an order, but it can be re-arranged.  They are often punctuated by geologic elements and activity. However gingerly an island arc docks against a continent, it is not a gentle process. Rocks fold, melt and metamorphose. Mountains rise. A new … Continue reading Glaciers – Butterflies – Change

World Conservation Day 2017

In honor of World Conservation Day, NWNL wants to share some of it's favorite photographs from over the years of each of our case-study watersheds. Trout Lake in the Columbia River Basin   Aerial view of the largest tributary of the Lower Omo River   Canoeing on the Mississippi River   Fisherman with his canoe … Continue reading World Conservation Day 2017

Chasing Environmental Change

By Joannah Otis, for No Water No Life Joannah is a Georgetown University sophomore studying Environmental Studies, Art History and Psychology. A member of the university’s Environmental Club, she enjoys spending her free time in N.J.'s Raritan River Basin, a NWNL case study watershed.  Joannah is a NWNL Researcher for Fall 2017.  Below is Part II of … Continue reading Chasing Environmental Change

On “The Rim of Fire”

Essay and Photos by NWNL Director Alison M. Jones.  FIVE NWNL EXPEDITIONS have focused on CA’s recent multi-year drought, ended by winter 2017’s heavy snows and rains.  I returned last week to report on any impacts from that drought - only to find drought is back already! Flying into Central California, I was stunned to … Continue reading On “The Rim of Fire”

Drought: A Photo Essay

From 2014 until the beginning of 2017  California suffered through a major drought. It was a hot topic in the news, and NWNL conducted five Spotlight Expeditions to document and bring attention to that drought and its significance.  But what exactly is a drought? What causes droughts?  What are the effects of droughts? What does … Continue reading Drought: A Photo Essay

Glaciers: A Photo Essay

Edit (9/27/17): Since publishing this blog, the Washington Post reported the calving (or splitting) of a key Antarctic glacier, the Pine Island Glacier.  The article states, "the single glacier alone contains 1.7 feet of potential global sea level rise and is thought to be in a process of unstable, ongoing retreat."  To learn more about how … Continue reading Glaciers: A Photo Essay

On Combating Drought and Desertification

Today is "World Day for Combating Drought and Desertification."  Ironically, today I am on a NWNL expedition in Nebraska atop the northeastern edge of the Ogallala Aquifer, which spans and supplies water to 8 states, all the way down to Texas.  The farmers I've talked to here are all aware of this observance.  After all, … Continue reading On Combating Drought and Desertification