Posts Tagged ‘expedition’

NANPA News* highlights NWNL and Alison M. Jones

November 7, 2014

*North American Nature Photography Association newsletter.

Jones_080204_ET_8207I’ve always enjoyed water. I grew up on a small rural stream with frogs, moss, trout, rocks and fog. Years later, copiloting over sub-Sahara Africa, I saw clearly that where there was no water, there was no life. Thus, No Water No Life ® (NWNL) became the title of my quest to combine the powers of photography, science and stakeholder information to raise awareness of the vulnerability of our fresh water resources.

The following are my daily mantras:

African proverb: “You think of water when the well is dry.”

Leonardo da Vinci: “Water is the driver of nature.”

The Dalai Lama: “The first medicine on this planet was water.”

Words are powerful.
But, if one photograph has the power of 1,000 words, then a photograph that is captioned must be worth 100,000 words.

NANPA award recipient James Balog said, “Science gave me a new lens through which to see the world… a more holistic view and appreciation of the natural environment.” I too relish having science and NWNL goals attached to my lenses, endowing my images with greater impact.

In 2 years the Isle de Jean-Charles, inspiration for the Academy Award-winnning “Beasts of the Southern Wild” will probably be lost to sea-level rise and subsidence.

In 2 years the Isle de Jean-Charles, inspiration for the Academy Award-winnning “Beasts of the Southern Wild” will probably be lost to sea-level rise and subsidence.

In eight years NWNL has completed 22 expeditions to six case-study watersheds in Africa (Nile, Omo and Mara river basins) and North America (Columbia, Mississippi and Raritan river basins). Resulting imagery, research and blogs are on our website (http://www.nowater-nolife.org) — and those of International Rivers, American Rivers and others. NWNL documentation is further shared via social media, lectures, exhibits, and in books and magazine articles.

We’ve focused on glaciers and tarns (in the Columbia, Mississippi and Nile basins), lakes (including Kenya’s Lake Turkana, now imperiled by Ethiopian hydro-dams on the Omo River), meadows and Texas playas, wetlands (half of these naturally-filtered nurseries are already gone), tributaries, forests (disappearing from Earth at a rate of 36 football fields per minute), riparian corridors, flyways, estuaries and delta lands (disappearing from the Mississippi Delta at the rate of one football field per hour).

Jones_130124_K_3308

Subsistence fishermen on Kenya’s remote Lake Turkana are learning that intensive water extractions by Ethiopian commercial agriculture will ruin their lake and fisheries.

NWNL has interviewed hundreds of scientists, stewards and stakeholders. These commentaries, which we call “Voices of the River,” discuss pollution, climate change, fracking, population growth in Africa, dams and levees, water usage by agriculture and industry, and tropic cascades of predators—anything impacting the health of watersheds. NWNL has recorded solutions from Canadian glaciologists, Maasai wilderness guides, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, historians, farmers and others on how to protect riverine corridors and ecosystems and ensure freshwater availability and quality.

Jones_070804_NJ_7826The overall NWNL goal is to transcend boundaries, bridge divisions and differences, suggest the shape of the future, capture imagination, stir consciences and create change. At NANPA’s 2002 Jacksonville Summit, art critic Vicki Goldberg described the power of photography to meet these objectives: “A photograph is like a lobbyist who sways a legislator.” Apollo 17’s “Blue Marble,” probably the most widely distributed image in human history, is a great example of imagery awakening a global awareness of our unique watery bonds. The connection with Earth’s beauty, which that image evokes, mirrors a comment by Terry Tempest Williams at the October 2014 observance of the 50th anniversary of The Wilderness Act: “We have no choice but to stand for what we love… We the people must walk with the river.”

NWNL will be collating and publishing many more images, videos and essays in online and print media. Upcoming NWNL photoessays will assess and compare water issues in developed and developing worlds, rural and urban regions, upstream and downstream. NWNL will also continue its newly initiated “Spotlights” on critical water issues such as the devastating drought in California.

NWNL appreciates the voluntary contributions of student interns’ research and guest photographers on our expeditions. We also thank photographers working in our case-study watersheds who share their images and findings with NWNL.

NWNL fiscal support comes from individuals, family foundations, grants and generous in-kind donations. To support NWNL in raising awareness of the vulnerability of our freshwater resources, checks to No Water No Life can be sent to Alison Jones, director of No Water No Life, 330 East 79th Street, NY, NY 10075 or via PayPal offered on the NWNL website http://nowater-nolife.org/supportUs/index.html).

Alison M. Jones is a conservation photographer who has documented ecosystems and resource management for more than 25 years in Africa and the Americas. She is the director and lead photographer at NWNL.

Story and photographs by Alison M. Jones.
Published by the North American Nature Photography Association.

Our 20th Expedition!

August 26, 2014

Please Help Fund the NWNL
Lower Mississippi River Expedition

September 2 – 30, 2014

Baton Rouge Industry on the Mississippi River

Baton Rouge Industry on the Mississippi River

Expedition Route

NWNL will visit the Lower Mississippi River Basin including: New Orleans, The Delta, Baton Rouge, Natchez, Vicksburg, Clarksdale, Memphis and small river towns en route.

Expedition Focus

• Urban and Rural Resiliency to Climate Change.

• Coastal Erosion and Changes in Sediment Loads.

• The Value of Mississippi River Transportation.

• Pollution from Industrial, Agricultural and Urban Runoff.

• Protection of Migratory Birds and Watershed Biodiversity.

• Loss of Cypress, Hardwood Forests and Wetlands.

• Effectiveness of Levees, Locks and Dams, and Floodways.

• Green Infrastructure and Sustainable Resource Management.

Why support a No Water No Life expedition?

NWNL expeditions help raise global awareness of freshwater availability, quality and usage. For eight years, NWNL has returned with interviews, still photos and video imagery from our six case-study watersheds in North America and Africa. This documentation informs and inspires actions that will help insure…
fresh water, for everyone, forever.

Donations to NWNL

Cotton plantation tractor

Cotton plantation tractor

Donations can be made via Pay Pal,
or checks made out to
“No Water No Life”

(to be sent to:

Alison Jones
No Water No Life
330 East 79th Street
New York, NY 10075)

Your support and contributions would be greatly appreciated!

Preserving the beautiful Snake River!

May 14, 2014
Snake River in Idaho - Photo by Barbara Folger.

Snake River in Idaho – Photo by Barbara Folger.

NWNL Expedition Photographers are zigzagging with the Snake River, focusing on infrastructure, watershed management, agriculture, biodiversity and impacts of climate and pollution on river health.

NWNL Expedition Spotlights California Drought! 

March 14, 2014

 Chasing California’s Thirst
  March 14-26, 2014 Expedition

No Water No Life will visit the Sacramento Delta from San Francisco Bay to Antioch, the Sacramento River from the Delta north to the Butte Sink region, and the San Joaquin River from the Delta south to Bakersfield to document causes, impacts and solutions of California’s drought with photography, video and stakeholder interviews.

PROBLEMS:
– Increased Population and Growing Irrigation Demands with Finite Water Supplies
– Neither Consumers nor Regulators have sufficiently addressed The Value of Water

JUSTIFICATIONS:
– It affects us all!  CA supplies 50% of US veggies, fruits and nuts.
– No Water – No Irrigation – No Farms – No Food – No Jobs = Economic hit for all of the US!
– CA’s Drought Solutions can help solve the global problem of  “More people – Less available clean water.”

PURPOSE:
NWNL will document causes, impacts and solutions to CA’s Drought.
How will CA move from Water Scarcity to Water Sustainability?

LAST CHANCE TO ENTER THE FUN!

November 1, 2013

THE TENNESSEE AND OHIO RIVER NO WATER NO LIFE EXPEDITION HAS JUST ENDED!

How many miles did Alison’s ’88 BMW (a.k.a. Black Beauty)
travel within the Tennessee and Ohio River Basins
during No Water No Life’s 5 week documentation of the
values and vulnerability of fresh water resources in
WV, VA, NC, TN, AL, MS, KY, IL, IN, OH, and PA?

It only costs $5 for each guess you submit!
Submit as many as you want! (Submit by Nov 8th!)

WINNER gets ¼ of the pot and a signed photo by Alison
Use Paypal or mail cash or check.
Include your mileage guess in an envelope or
e-mail to: alison@nowater-nolife.org

* Need a hint?
View the Expedition Itinerary.
View Distance Calculations below.

Check out photos from NWNL’s expedition on Instagram and Flickr!

Good Luck and Thank You for your support!

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on the road / on the river

October 17, 2013
USA: Kentucky, Ohio and Tennessee River Confluence

USA: Kentucky, Ohio and Tennessee River Confluence

I started out thinking of America as highways and state lines. As I got to know it better, I began to think of it as rivers. Most of what I love about the country is a gift of the rivers. . . . America is a great story, and there is a river on every page of it.


~ Charles Kuralt, On the Road With Charles Kuralt

USA:  Louisiana, the Atchafalaya Basin, Morgan City waterfront seen from Berwick's Belleview Front Street, the Long-Allen Bridge, (aka "the old bridge" or The Atchafalaya Bridge used by LA 182 to cross the Atchafalaya River), and behind is the E.J. Lionel Grizzaffi Bridge (aka "the new bridge" for Interstate 90 to cross the Atchafalaya River)

USA: Louisiana, the Atchafalaya Basin, Morgan City waterfront seen from Berwick’s Belleview Front Street, the Long-Allen Bridge, (aka “the old bridge” or The Atchafalaya Bridge used by LA 182 to cross the Atchafalaya River), and behind is the E.J. Lionel Grizzaffi Bridge (aka “the new bridge” for Interstate 90 to cross the Atchafalaya River)

Foiled !

October 9, 2013

Today I tried to go to the Shiloh Indian Mounds in TN and the Holcut Memorial in MS (dedicated to a town submerged in the 80’s when the Feds constructed the Tennessee- Tombigbee Waterway). This is what I saw at both places:

closed-gov-shutdown

It’s the same shut gate I’ve seen on this month’s expedition at Great Smoky Mountain Nat’l Park, Wheeler Nat’l Park, Lookout Mtn Nat’l Park, etc.  Let’s hope this shutdown is resolved soon and I can get in to document Dale Hollow Nat’l Fish Hatchery, Big South Fork Nat’l River Area, Oak Ridge Nat’l Lab (for interview on climate change), the Land between the Lakes Nat’l Recreation Area, Shawnee Nat’l Forest, Cincinnati’s EPA Cluster Lab on Water Technology, et al.

Our National Parks, historic Parks, River Areas, and national Labs are probably more extensive and significant than most of us ever realize. On this expedition – with so many barriers up – I am overwhelmed by how much we take them for granted and what we lose when we don’t have them.

Hovering above the Tennessee River Basin

October 8, 2013
USA: Tennessee, Appalachia, Tennessee River Basin, SouthWings plane used in aerial flite of Chattanooga Region, Bowater Paper and Pulp Plant on Hiwassie River

USA: Tennessee, Appalachia, Tennessee River Basin, SouthWings plane used in aerial flite of Chattanooga Region, Bowater Paper and Pulp Plant on Hiwassie River

LOTTERY for our WATERSHEDS!

October 4, 2013

 

How many miles will Alison’s ’88 BMW (a.k.a. Black Beauty)
travel within the Tennessee and Ohio River Basins
so No Water No Life can document
values and vulnerability of fresh water resources of
WV, VA, TN, AL, MS, TN, KY, IL, IN, OH, and PA?

$5 per answer submitted!
WINNER gets ¼ of the pot and a signed photo by Alison
Use Paypal or mail cash or check.
Include your mileage guess in the envelope or
email to: alison@nowater-nolife.org

Make as many guesses as you want!

Screen Shot 2013-10-04 at 1.59.41 PM

View the Expedition’s Itinerary and Purpose.

Thank you for your support!

http://www.nowater-nolife.org

Feelin’ free on a raft…I mean, in a Prius rental car

May 22, 2013

Image

“We said there warn’t no home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery, but a raft don’t. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft.”
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain

NWNL Director Alison M. Jones is currently following the Mississippi River and its tributaries. Starting at the headwaters of Lake Itasca, Minnesota and meandering into the middle basin area of Saint Genevieve, Missouri (where she photographed the Flood of ’93) Jones is interviewing stakeholders and stewards along the way, exploring threats and possible management solutions of this watershed. Read the Brief for the Expedition.

2MO-STG-407 © Alison M. Jones– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

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