Posts Tagged ‘EPA’

We’re all connected downstream

April 4, 2014
USA:  New Jersey, Mountainville, Guinea Hollow Stream, early spring

USA: New Jersey, Mountainville, Guinea Hollow Stream, early spring

WHAT YOU CAN DO to protect our water resources:
Support the EPA and US Army Corps of Engineers –

It’s critical we all have clean fresh water! The EPA and USACE are proposing a clarification of their rules that protect our water quality by addressing upstream impacts on downstream communities. Ending loopholes in the 1970’s Clean Water Act will stop the free dumping of toxins into small streams and wetlands. This will affect some farmers’ use of pesticides and herbicides; but it will encourage restoration of riverine corridors and wetlands that filter such toxins. In the long-run, a tighter Clean Water Act will benefit us all.

NWNL asks everyone to jump in here!!

— Read the proposal.
— Listen to EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy on this ruling.
Contact the EPA during its 90-day Comment Period.

 

Earth-POWER!

March 28, 2014
USA: California, San Francisco

USA: California, San Francisco

Give Mother Nature a break!
Shut OFF your lights on Saturday, March 30th from 8:30-9:30pm local time for Earth Hour.

The use of water and of energy are intricately intertwined.
–Saving Energy Saves Water: The production of energy — hydroelectric, industrial steam-power generation, fracking, etc— requires a lot of water.
–Saving Water Saves Energy: The extraction, treatment, distribution, and use of water – which is then followed by the collection and treatment of wastewater – requires a lot of energy.
–Saving Water and Energy Saves Greenhouse Gas Emissions! It’s up to state, tribal, and local governments – as well as us! – to implement actions that address energy-water-climate change challenges.

See also EPA on the Water-Energy Nexus

DID YOU KNOW?

— Running the hot water faucet for 5 minutes uses about the same amount of energy as burning a 60-watt bulb for 14 hours –U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

–In 2000, thermoelectric facilities (industrial steam-power generation) used 195,000 million gallons of water a day. This represents almost half of all of the water withdrawn in the United States. – United States Geological Survey

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

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