Posts Tagged ‘endangered’

Lion Populations to Decline by Half

October 28, 2015

 

East Africa, Kenya, Mara River Basin, lioness with cubs

East Africa, Kenya, Mara River Basin, lioness with cubs

Lions are currently considered “vulnerable” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, but if upcoming assessments change their status to “endangered” they will be considered at “a very high risk of extinction in the wild”.  Scientists estimate that a mere 20,000 lions are left in all of Africa and that number will be halved in 20 years.

NWNL would like to honor these majestic animals by sharing some of our favorite lion images from our expeditions. We hope that recent public outrage over the death of Cecil, will draw attention to the plight of the African lion and boost conservation efforts.

Read related articles in the NY Times and on BBC World News.

(Click on thumbnails to enlarge.)

Kenya: Maasai Mara Game Reserve, head of large-maned male lion lying in grasses

Kenya: Maasai Mara Game Reserve, head of large-maned male lion lying in grasses

Posted by Jasmine Graf, Associate Director of No Water No Life.

Knowing the facts will help us SAVE ELEPHANTS

August 19, 2014
Kenya: Amboseli National Park, male elephant in mud hole, baboons in distance.

Kenya: Amboseli National Park, male elephant in mud hole, baboons in distance.

Ironically, just after our blog yesterday, about the remarkable qualities of elephants, more sad statistics were featured in today’s NY Times, p. A9.

Study Details Elephant Deaths

Poachers killed an estimated 100,000 elephants across Africa from 2010 to 2012, a huge spike in the continent’s death rate of the world’s largest mammals because of an increased demand for ivory in China and other Asian nations, a study published Monday found. Warnings about elephant slaughters have been ringing for years, but Monday’s study is the first to scientifically quantify the number of deaths across the continent by measuring deaths in one park in Kenya and using other published data to extrapolate fatality tolls across the continent. The study found that the proportion of illegally killed elephants had climbed from 25 percent of all elephant deaths a decade ago to roughly 65 percent of all elephant deaths today, a percentage that, if continued will lead to the extinction of the species. The study, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was carried out by experts from Save the Elephants, the Kenya Wildlife Service, an international group called MIKE responsible for monitoring the illegal killings of elephants, and two universities.

Read more about this in the Huffington Post.

Kenya: Amboseli Nat'l Park, baby elephant with herd of females in background.

Kenya: Amboseli National Park, baby elephant with herd of females in background.

An elephant’s memory of water

August 18, 2014

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The African savannah elephant is the largest land mammal in the world. In folklore, elephants are known for not forgetting. For the African savannah elephant, memory is a tool for surviving challenges that may come intermittently over decades. Long-term memory tends to be vested in the older females, called matriarchs, without which the herd could die of starvation or dehydration. During the drought of 1993 in Tanzania, elephant matriarchs that remembered a similar drought 35 years before led their herds beyond the borders of Tarangire National Park in search of food and water. Groups with matriarchs that were not old enough to remember the previous drought suffered a 63 percent mortality of their calves that year. (Source: Wildlife Conservation Society)

< Click on thumbnails below for captions and larger view. >

Elephants are not human, of course. They are something much more ancient and primordial, living on a different plane of existence. Long before we arrived on the scene, they worked out a way of being in the world that has not fundamentally changed and is sustainable, and not predatory or destructive.
~Alex Shoumatoff

Discover more interesting facts about Loxodonta africana.

Read the story of Satao, a bull elephant who lived in the arid plains northwest of Mombasa, who had tusks so long that when he walked they nearly scraped the ground.

Take the IFAW pledge to PROTECT ELEPHANTS!

Kenya: Samburu National Reserve, female African elephant with two young adults and baby drinking from Uaso Nyiro River

Kenya: Samburu National Reserve, female African elephant with two young adults and baby drinking from Uaso Nyiro River

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

The Most Endangered Rivers in America – 2014

April 9, 2014

The worst is California’s San Joaquin River:
Part of the NWNL California Drought SPOTLIGHT

NWNL is contributing images and blogs in support of
American Rivers’ efforts in the San Joaquin Basin.

USA: California, San Joaquin River Valley

USA: California, San Joaquin River Valley

Two other river basins on American Rivers Top 10 List this year overlap with NWNL case-study watersheds:

– The Upper and Middle Mississippi River Basin (#3) was documented May 2013 by NWNL

– The Lower Clearwater River (#10) will be documented May 2014 by NWNL (as part of the Columbia River Basin)

Our future depends on the health of our rivers and protecting these vital ecosystems. Learn more about rivers and see what you can do.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

I Am RED – a must see video poem

January 31, 2014

The Colorado River —
The Most Endangered River in America 2013

I have run these canyons for six million years.

I have traveled from the Rocky Mountains to the deserts, through scorching heat, and freezing cold. 

From the land of the dinosaurs to fields of food.

I lend my hand to seven states, two countries, nine National Parks and 36 million people across an arid west.

I am not the strongest or the largest, but I am the hardest working.

People love me, my playfulness, my beauty, my power, my life.

But I don’t think I can offer any more.

I am tired, tapped and tied.

Of the hundreds of major rivers in the world, I am one of the few who no longer kisses the sea.

Battles to harness my soul have been won and lost.

Use me wisely and I will sustain you.

Use me like you have and I will break.

My name is Red.

The Grand River, Red.

The American Nile.

The Canyon Maker.

I am the Colorado River.

And I am the most endangered river in America.

—-

Directed and written by Pete McBride Productions.
Cinematography: Pete McBride, Ron Chapple, Skip Armstrong, Kontent Films.
Still Imagery: Pete McBride
Voices: Duke Beardsley, Alma del Rio.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

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