Celebrating World Wildlife Day!

By Christina Belasco Today we celebrate World Wildlife Day. Acting to preserve our planet's treasured biodiversity is more important now than ever. To honor our beloved creatures we share with you all today photos from our African and North American case study watersheds! We can never forget that these animals all depend on healthy, clean fresh … Continue reading Celebrating World Wildlife Day!

A Blind Eye to Flooding – No More Excuses

By Alison Jones, No Water No Life Director NWNL sends our sympathies to those suffering from Hermine’s winds and rains. As this hurricane slashes its way north, we hope for the least amount of flood damage possible. As 2012’s Superstorm Sandy and August’s Louisiana Floods showed, we have created a bad scenario along our waterways. … Continue reading A Blind Eye to Flooding – No More Excuses

A Nameless Louisiana Flood: Tragedy and Case Study

By Alison M. Jones No Water No Life's thoughts are with all who’ve lost so much in Louisiana, particularly in eastern Baton Rouge. In our 5 watershed expeditions in the Lower Mississippi River Basin, we have learned much about flooding. This essay analyzes the history, causes and devastating effects of high-water events in Louisiana, and all … Continue reading A Nameless Louisiana Flood: Tragedy and Case Study

2016 Flooding in Vicksburg and a NWNL 2014 Interview with US Army Corps of Engineers

THIS WEEK's RECORD-BREAKING MISSISSIPPI RIVER FLOOD This winter’s costly Mississippi River Flood is now predicted to crest at Vicksburg on Friday Jan 15 at approximately 52 feet – 9 feet above the USGS official flood level.  The home of the US Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg has known great changes in its river hydrology.  In … Continue reading 2016 Flooding in Vicksburg and a NWNL 2014 Interview with US Army Corps of Engineers

Gathering Momentum

A STRONG PUSH... In Paris this month 195 countries tackled climate change together, due to increased public awareness. TO KEEP MOVING... Climate change is still in question, NOT out of the question! AND PAYING ATTENTION. Climate change is invisible, but its causes and effects are visible. Photography has been a critical tool in communicating the … Continue reading Gathering Momentum

#Climate4Peace – NOW

The last few months have been charged with galvanizing grassroots energy. We’ve seen 'Kayak-tivists' halt Shell’s Arctic icebreaker, and campaigns such as Keep it in the Ground and DIVEST.  People are increasingly  gathering and marching in hundreds of cities around the world and calling for clean energy solutions. In NYC this past weekend, global activism … Continue reading #Climate4Peace – NOW

Drought and Flooding increases CA Levees risk of failure

Almost 5 years of drought, now combined with recent rainfall-induced flooding, has weakened California's levees. Culprits are soil cracking that allows water seepage, soil-strength reduction, land subsidence and erosion, all of which NWNL observed on its California Spotlight expeditions in 2014 and 2015. Fifty-five percent of California's levee systems are now in danger of failing … Continue reading Drought and Flooding increases CA Levees risk of failure

Will there be enough water when the cranes return?

by Barbara Folger, NWNL Project Coordinator. Will there be enough water for these Greater Sandhill Cranes when they return to the San Francisco Bay Delta this fall? With the state’s snowpack down to 5% of average, the lowest ever recorded, Governor Brown has mandated a 25% water use reduction. This is the first time an … Continue reading Will there be enough water when the cranes return?

NANPA News* highlights NWNL and Alison M. Jones

*North American Nature Photography Association newsletter. I’ve always enjoyed water. I grew up on a small rural stream with frogs, moss, trout, rocks and fog. Years later, copiloting over sub-Sahara Africa, I saw clearly that where there was no water, there was no life. Thus, No Water No Life ® (NWNL) became the title of … Continue reading NANPA News* highlights NWNL and Alison M. Jones

Shrimpin’ in Louisiana – a waning tradition?

Shrimp boats are a common sight, but shrimpers and oystermen in the Mississippi River Delta are struggling with decreased fisheries due to oil spills, and changes in water salinity and temperatures. Related reading: Louisiana oyster and shrimp industries in serious decline after BP oil spill