Archive for the 'Other N. Amer. Watersheds' Category

LNG Threat to Hudson and Raritan River Estuaries

November 3, 2015
LNG pipeline to cross the western Lower NY Bay, which is the Raritan Bay

LNG pipeline to cross western Lower NY Bay’s Raritan Bay

USA: Fishing in Raritan Bay off Sandy Hook right above proposed route for the LNG pipeline

Raritan Bay off Sandy Hook over proposed LNG pipeline route

NY/NJ Baykeeper is a strong voice fighting an LNG terminal (see definition below) that would threaten the biodiversity and water quality of the Hudson and Raritan River Estuary, one of the largest ports in the world. LNG usage, which furthers greenhouse gas emissions, is also a concern.

Dolphins swimming this summer just outside the Raritan Bay

Dolphins swimming this summer just outside the Raritan Bay

WHAT is Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)?

Liquefied Natural Gas is natural gas that has been super-chilled to minus 260 degrees, turning it into a liquid that is 1/600th the original volume of gas. It is clear, colorless, odorless, and extremely volatile. This gas is compacted so large volumes can be shipped overseas. LNG should not be confused with gasoline or compressed natural gas.

LNG is Expensive. The intensive energy use required to liquefy natural gas and shipping costs makes LNG up to three times more expensive than domestic natural gas.

LNG is Dirty. It results in up to 40% more greenhouse gas emissions than domestic natural gas due to a life cycle that requires super-cooling, transporting overseas in giant tankers, and heating back to gaseous form.

WHAT is Port Ambrose?
As proposed by Liberty Natural Gas (confusingly also called “LNG”),  “Port Ambrose” would be an offshore port for importing or exporting LNG to or from the coasts of New York and New Jersey. This port would allow two LNG vessels (which are as long as the World Trade Center Tower is tall) to directly connect to the region’s natural gas system, with a capacity that could be expanded.

Read more from the “Port Ambrose Fact Sheet: A Proposed Offshore Liquefied Natural Gas Facility”

PROTECT THIS ESTUARY and OUR OCEAN by supporting “The New Jersey/New York Clean Ocean Zone Act,” which is bi-partisan, bi-state legislation to permanently protect the waters off the NY/NJ coast from polluting activities and facilities, such as LNG ports.

USA: NY/NJ Baykeeper  headed downstream towards Middlesex County Landfill

NY/NJ Baykeeper , on the Raritan River, is actively fighting this Port Ambrose LNG proposal

An Educational Resource For Teachers: Exploring the New York New Jersey Harbor Estuary Region

Summer Saturday on the Hudson

July 8, 2015
USA: New York, Adirondacks State Park,  source of the Hudson River

USA: New York, Adirondacks State Park, source of the Hudson River

Following Rivers with Alison M. Jones

Artist Talk on Saturday 7/11 from 6-7:30pm
Join me as I share the inspiration and creative process behind photographs taken while on expedition in Africa and North America for No Water No Life ®.

Following Rivers, curated by Jasmine Graf, is a compelling collection of giclee photographs grouped together with informational captioning that illustrates that what we do in our communities impacts the availability, quality and usage of our freshwater resources.
Photography by Alison M. Jones on view @ Beacon Institute for Rivers & Estuaries
Through October 3, 2015 at 199 Main Street in Beacon, NY.
(845) 838-1600

Part of Beacon’s “Second Saturday,” a city-wide celebration of free arts + culture events.

Oysters for the Raritan and Hudson Bays

May 6, 2014

oysters

NWNL focuses on solutions to watershed degradation as much as it does on watershed threats. This spring, NWNL guest writer Carly Shields is investigating an exciting innovative approach to reducing pollution and stabilizing shorelines in the New Jersey-New York Raritan and Hudson Bays. Her first report begins:

“Oysters are more than something you’re served at a restaurant with Tabasco or Worcestershire sauce and a glass of white wine. Oysters are actually a keystone species in North America – and especially in areas like the New York Harbor. In two watersheds that were once the main source for the oyster business, concerned scientists and stewards are now trying to re-seed, and eventually re-harvest, a billion oysters in the waters of New York City.  New York Harbor School students are making it possible for these pollution-filtering mollusks to make a comeback.

Jones_050323_ARG_0021

The marine-science focus of the high school on Governors Island is teaching its own students and middle school students in all five boroughs about the importance of oysters in their local waters and how to be the caretakers for these shellfish. This public high school is spawning oyster larvae:  something not done by any other school in the state of New York or anywhere – outside of California.

With the help of NYC students, the school has already grown seven million oysters, which are now back in the New York Harbor. Aquaculture teachers from the school are helping students take New York harbor water, and then spiking the water temperatures. This allows the larvae to think it’s time to spawn. The larvae then metamorphose into full-sized adult oysters.“

Jones_120429_NY_1743

Further investigations and interviews by Carly Shields for NWNL will explain the ecological importance of re-establishing oyster beds to improve water quality and strengthen shorelines. The latter is increasingly necessary due to wave erosion and higher water levels from severe storms like Sandy and further climate disruption.

Protect Our Water Resources

April 30, 2014

 

NYC SAFE Disposal Events in Spring 2014 (held rain or shine):

Sun, May 4 – Brooklyn, McCarren Park

Sat, May 10 – Bronx, Orchard Beach Parking Lot

Sun, May 11 – Manhattan, Union Square, North Plaza

Sat, May 17 – Staten Island, Midland Beach Parking Lot

For more info – http://www.nyc.gov/html/nycwasteless/html/events/bwprr_safe.shtml

https://www.facebook.com/NYCRecycles

https://twitter.com/nycrecycles

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Signs Along the Way

April 8, 2014

Here’s some of the signs we’ve come across during No Water No Life Expeditions over the years. Enjoy!

USA: Kentucky, Tennessee River Basin

USA: Kentucky, Tennessee River Basin

Kenya:  Mara River Basin, conservation sign in Mau Forest on Saosa River east of Kericho

Kenya: Mara River Basin, conservation sign in Mau Forest on Saosa River

USA: Tennessee River Basin, Chickamauga Dam owned by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

USA: Tennessee River Basin, Chickamauga Dam owned by TVA

Kenya: Mara River Basin, Mulot

Kenya: Mara River Basin, Mulot

Kenya: Mara River Basin, Nairobi, pots of charcoal for sale for 30 Kenyan shillings each (50 US cents)

Kenya: Mara River Basin, Nairobi, pots of charcoal for sale for 30 Kenyan shillings each (50 US cents)

USA: Mississippi, Tennessee River Basin

USA: Mississippi, Tennessee River Basin

USA: Kentucky, Tennessee River Basin

USA: Kentucky, Tennessee River Basin

Posted in response to “A Word a Week” Challenge – Signs.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

I Am RED – a must see video poem

January 31, 2014

The Colorado River —
The Most Endangered River in America 2013

I have run these canyons for six million years.

I have traveled from the Rocky Mountains to the deserts, through scorching heat, and freezing cold. 

From the land of the dinosaurs to fields of food.

I lend my hand to seven states, two countries, nine National Parks and 36 million people across an arid west.

I am not the strongest or the largest, but I am the hardest working.

People love me, my playfulness, my beauty, my power, my life.

But I don’t think I can offer any more.

I am tired, tapped and tied.

Of the hundreds of major rivers in the world, I am one of the few who no longer kisses the sea.

Battles to harness my soul have been won and lost.

Use me wisely and I will sustain you.

Use me like you have and I will break.

My name is Red.

The Grand River, Red.

The American Nile.

The Canyon Maker.

I am the Colorado River.

And I am the most endangered river in America.

—-

Directed and written by Pete McBride Productions.
Cinematography: Pete McBride, Ron Chapple, Skip Armstrong, Kontent Films.
Still Imagery: Pete McBride
Voices: Duke Beardsley, Alma del Rio.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Weekly Photo Challenge: Grand

December 11, 2013
California: Death Valley National Park, view from Zabriskie Point with tourist enjoying overlook, January.

California: Death Valley National Park, view from Zabriskie Point with tourist enjoying overlook, January.

No Water No Life’s photo pick in response to The Daily Post’s Blog –  Weekly Photo Challenge: Grand.

A Word a Week Challenge: LINES

November 19, 2013

Click on photos to enlarge and view captions.

http://suellewellyn2011.wordpress.com/2013/11/19/a-word-a-week-challenge-lines/#comments

October 23, 2013
USA:  Louisiana, the Atchafalaya Basin, Gulf Island Fabrication Plant, on Route 311 south of Houma (Terrabonne Parish), white ibis (Eudocimus albus)

USA: Louisiana, Atchafalaya Basin, Gulf Island Fabrication Plant, on Rte 311 south of Houma (Terrabonne Parish), white ibis (Eudocimus albus)

A map of all the rivers in the continental US – and only that!

August 14, 2013

Check out the gorgeous blue life lines on a map by Nelson Minar. Customize your own vector map on Github.

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