Day Zero – A Water Warning

By Stephanie Sheng for No Water No Life (NWNL) Edited by NWNL Director, Alison Jones Stephanie Sheng is a passionate strategist for environmental and cultural conservation. Having worked in private and commercial sectors, she now uses her branding and communications expertise to drive behavior change that will help protect our natural resources. Inspired by conservation … Continue reading Day Zero – A Water Warning

Amboseli Wetlands

by Pongpol Adireksarn for No Water No Life Edited by Alison Jones, NWNL Director Kilimanjaro is Africa’s highest and most well-known mountain. The Maasai call it “Ol Dolnyo Oibor” (The White Mountain) because of its snow-capped top, a symbolic landmark for centuries. Besides being picturesque, Kilimanjaro has lived up to its reputation as “The Life-giving … Continue reading Amboseli Wetlands

Glaciers: A Photo Essay

Edit (9/27/17): Since publishing this blog, the Washington Post reported the calving (or splitting) of a key Antarctic glacier, the Pine Island Glacier.  The article states, "the single glacier alone contains 1.7 feet of potential global sea level rise and is thought to be in a process of unstable, ongoing retreat."  To learn more about how … Continue reading Glaciers: A Photo Essay

Lion Populations to Decline by Half

  Lions are currently considered "vulnerable" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, but if upcoming assessments change their status to "endangered" they will be considered at "a very high risk of extinction in the wild".  Scientists estimate that a mere 20,000 lions are left in all of Africa and that number will be … Continue reading Lion Populations to Decline by Half

Happy World Elephant Day!

For 30 years NWNL has studied Kenya’s iconic, charismatic jumbos that create water access for so many other species in the Mara River Basin. What can you do to celebrate and help elephants? (scroll down for a few ideas 🙂 ) Participate in the #elegram project ---------> and tell others to participate too! Send an … Continue reading Happy World Elephant Day!

Blue and Green – finding balance

- Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Charcoal burning destroys Kenya’s forests

  How many trees are cut down to make one bag of charcoal? This illegal trade destroys endangered animals natural habitat and puts pressure on the entire ecosystem. Fact - In Kenya, charcoal provides energy for 82% of urban and 34% of rural households. Source: http://asokoinsight.com/news/illegal-logging-charcoal-burning-destroying-east-africas-forests/ - Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director