Archive for the 'Other African Watersheds' Category

Lion Populations to Decline by Half

October 28, 2015

 

East Africa, Kenya, Mara River Basin, lioness with cubs

East Africa, Kenya, Mara River Basin, lioness with cubs

Lions are currently considered “vulnerable” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, but if upcoming assessments change their status to “endangered” they will be considered at “a very high risk of extinction in the wild”.  Scientists estimate that a mere 20,000 lions are left in all of Africa and that number will be halved in 20 years.

NWNL would like to honor these majestic animals by sharing some of our favorite lion images from our expeditions. We hope that recent public outrage over the death of Cecil, will draw attention to the plight of the African lion and boost conservation efforts.

Read related articles in the NY Times and on BBC World News.

(Click on thumbnails to enlarge.)

Kenya: Maasai Mara Game Reserve, head of large-maned male lion lying in grasses

Kenya: Maasai Mara Game Reserve, head of large-maned male lion lying in grasses

Posted by Jasmine Graf, Associate Director of No Water No Life.

Happy World Elephant Day!

August 12, 2015

For 30 years NWNL has studied Kenya’s iconic, charismatic jumbos that create water access for so many other species in the Mara River Basin. What can you do to celebrate and help elephants?
(scroll down for a few ideas 🙂 )

Participate in the #elegram project ———> and tell others to participate too!

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Send an E-Card for World Elephant Day!

Check out the World Elephant Day website for updates and news 🙂

Zambia:  Jeki, elephant ("Loxodonta africana") crossing Zambezi R.

Zambia: Jeki, elephant (“Loxodonta africana”) crossing Zambezi River

Kenya: Maasai (aka Masai) Mara National Reserve, Mara Conservancy, Mara Triangle, Trans Mora aerial (from helicopter), elephant near muddy tributary of Mara River,

Kenya: Maasai Mara National Reserve, Mara Conservancy, elephant near muddy tributary of Mara River

Blue and Green – finding balance

October 6, 2014

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Charcoal burning destroys Kenya’s forests

September 5, 2014

 

Africa:  Kenya; North Rift District, Turkana Land, bags of charcoal for sale

Africa: Kenya; North Rift District, bags of charcoal for sale

How many trees are cut down to make one bag of charcoal? This illegal trade destroys endangered animals natural habitat and puts pressure on the entire ecosystem.

Fact – In Kenya, charcoal provides energy for 82% of urban and 34% of rural households. Source: http://asokoinsight.com/news/illegal-logging-charcoal-burning-destroying-east-africas-forests/

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Knowing the facts will help us SAVE ELEPHANTS

August 19, 2014
Kenya: Amboseli National Park, male elephant in mud hole, baboons in distance.

Kenya: Amboseli National Park, male elephant in mud hole, baboons in distance.

Ironically, just after our blog yesterday, about the remarkable qualities of elephants, more sad statistics were featured in today’s NY Times, p. A9.

Study Details Elephant Deaths

Poachers killed an estimated 100,000 elephants across Africa from 2010 to 2012, a huge spike in the continent’s death rate of the world’s largest mammals because of an increased demand for ivory in China and other Asian nations, a study published Monday found. Warnings about elephant slaughters have been ringing for years, but Monday’s study is the first to scientifically quantify the number of deaths across the continent by measuring deaths in one park in Kenya and using other published data to extrapolate fatality tolls across the continent. The study found that the proportion of illegally killed elephants had climbed from 25 percent of all elephant deaths a decade ago to roughly 65 percent of all elephant deaths today, a percentage that, if continued will lead to the extinction of the species. The study, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was carried out by experts from Save the Elephants, the Kenya Wildlife Service, an international group called MIKE responsible for monitoring the illegal killings of elephants, and two universities.

Read more about this in the Huffington Post.

Kenya: Amboseli Nat'l Park, baby elephant with herd of females in background.

Kenya: Amboseli National Park, baby elephant with herd of females in background.

An elephant’s memory of water

August 18, 2014

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The African savannah elephant is the largest land mammal in the world. In folklore, elephants are known for not forgetting. For the African savannah elephant, memory is a tool for surviving challenges that may come intermittently over decades. Long-term memory tends to be vested in the older females, called matriarchs, without which the herd could die of starvation or dehydration. During the drought of 1993 in Tanzania, elephant matriarchs that remembered a similar drought 35 years before led their herds beyond the borders of Tarangire National Park in search of food and water. Groups with matriarchs that were not old enough to remember the previous drought suffered a 63 percent mortality of their calves that year. (Source: Wildlife Conservation Society)

< Click on thumbnails below for captions and larger view. >

Elephants are not human, of course. They are something much more ancient and primordial, living on a different plane of existence. Long before we arrived on the scene, they worked out a way of being in the world that has not fundamentally changed and is sustainable, and not predatory or destructive.
~Alex Shoumatoff

Discover more interesting facts about Loxodonta africana.

Read the story of Satao, a bull elephant who lived in the arid plains northwest of Mombasa, who had tusks so long that when he walked they nearly scraped the ground.

Take the IFAW pledge to PROTECT ELEPHANTS!

Kenya: Samburu National Reserve, female African elephant with two young adults and baby drinking from Uaso Nyiro River

Kenya: Samburu National Reserve, female African elephant with two young adults and baby drinking from Uaso Nyiro River

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

I dream of rain, I dream of gardens in the desert sand – Desert Rose

July 25, 2014
Ethiopia, Omo River Valley, view of Omo River with desert rose

Ethiopia, Omo River Valley, view of Omo River with desert rose

“Water is the true wealth in a dry land.”

–U.S. author Wallance Stegner, Beyond the Hundredth Meridian

The Desert Rose is not a real rose, or a member of the rosaceae family, but a spectacular succulent! It is sometimes called the Elephant’s Foot because its trunks swell to store water from summer rains to last thru the long dry winters.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Botswana’s Okavango Delta: UNESCO’s 1000th World Heritage Site!

July 9, 2014

A place as extraordinary as the Okavango Delta certainly deserves to be designated as a World Heritage Site – and finally it is!  As #1000 on that list, it’s one of NWNL’s favorite natural landscapes and wetlands ecosystem. You can see why in the photos. It’s literally an oasis in an arid country with no access to the sea. The Okavango River swells to three times its size during seasonal flooding, attracting one of Africa’s greatest concentrations of wildlife, including many endangered species. No Water – No Life!

Related reading: https://www.iucn.org/?16018/Iconic-Okavango-Delta-becomes-1000th-World-Heritage-site

http://www.okavangowildernessproject.org/

River waters are never the same from one moment to the next….

May 6, 2014
Kenya: Shaba National Reserve, Maasai moran in Ewosa Nyiro River

Kenya: Shaba National Reserve, Maasai moran in Ewosa Nyiro River

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Lichen is part of the biodiversity of vegetation in our watersheds and serves as tool for water retention.

April 30, 2014
Kenya: Mau Forest, source of the Mara River

Kenya: Mau Forest, source of the Mara River

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

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