Signs that you are an Environmentalist

New Jersey, Raritan River Basin
New Jersey, South Branch of the Raritan River

Have you ever posted about Climate Change on social media?

Do you care about animals and their habitat?

Have you used the word “sediment?”

Have you ever talked about soil in casual conversation?

If you answered YES to any of the above questions, think about becoming a Rutgers University Certified Environmental Steward. No previous environmental training is necessary. Anyone with an interest in the environment and a passion for creating positive change in their community can become an Environmental Steward thanks to this upcoming lecture series.

You will get training in:

New Jersey, stream water monitoring training
New Jersey, stream water monitoring training

•Soil health
•Climate change
•Habitat protection & restoration
•Stormwater management
•Energy conservation
•Geology
•Invasive species
•Municipal planning & ordinances
•Volunteer Monitoring
•Civic Science

The program is designed to give participants a better understanding of local issues that are important and to improve their own watersheds. Special focus will be on the Lower Raritan River Basin and invasive species management.

The program will be conducted at multiple locations in New Jersey.  It will include 60 hours of lecture and a 60-hour internship.  Classes will be on Wednesday evenings starting January 27th at 6:30 pm, continuing through June. The program is $250.00.  More info on the program website here.

Pass this along to folks who may be interested! It’s a great program!

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Lion Populations to Decline by Half

 

East Africa, Kenya, Mara River Basin, lioness with cubs
East Africa, Kenya, Mara River Basin, lioness with cubs

Lions are currently considered “vulnerable” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, but if upcoming assessments change their status to “endangered” they will be considered at “a very high risk of extinction in the wild”.  Scientists estimate that a mere 20,000 lions are left in all of Africa and that number will be halved in 20 years.

NWNL would like to honor these majestic animals by sharing some of our favorite lion images from our expeditions. We hope that recent public outrage over the death of Cecil, will draw attention to the plight of the African lion and boost conservation efforts.

Read related articles in the NY Times and on BBC World News.

(Click on thumbnails to enlarge.)

Kenya: Maasai Mara Game Reserve, head of large-maned male lion lying in grasses
Kenya: Maasai Mara Game Reserve, head of large-maned male lion lying in grasses

Posted by Jasmine Graf, Associate Director of No Water No Life.

WATER CONNECTS ALL

No Water – No Life!

Let’s protect it!

Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Theme: Connected.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

What are Phragmites and why are they a Problem?

USA: New York, Long Island, Huntington, Lloyd Harbor, red-winged blackbirds in phragmites (invasive) species)
USA: New York, Long Island, Huntington, Lloyd Harbor, red-winged blackbirds in phragmites (invasive species)
Non-native Phragmites, also known as common reed, is a perennial, aggressive wetland grass that displaces native plant and animal species. Invasive Phragmites is one of the most widespread plants on Earth and is found worldwide. In the U.S. it grows in the eastern states particularly along the Atlantic Coast and increasingly across the Midwest and Pacific Northwest. It is usually an indicator of a wetland ecosystem that is out of balance.  (click on thumbnails below for caption info)

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

The changing colors of water

Part of the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge theme: ROY G. BIV.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Enveloped – weekly photo challenge

USA: California, Big Sur, Salmon Creek Falls, waterfall covered with lichens and wildflowers
USA: California, Big Sur, Salmon Creek Falls, waterfall covered with lichens and wildflowers
East Africa, Kenya, Northern Frontier District, Chalbi Desert, Kalacha village, local house wrapped in cloth to prevent wind and dust from coming in
East Africa, Kenya, Chalbi Desert, local house wrapped in cloth to prevent wind and dust from coming in
USA:  Louisiana, the Atchafalaya Basin, Bayou Teche/Vermilion River Basin, Lake Martin, Cypress Island Preserve swamp (managed by The Nature Conservancy), duckweed covering a cypress-tupelo swamp
USA: Louisiana, Bayou Teche, duckweed covering a cypress-tupelo swamp
Texas: Tulia, weeds near cotton gin covered with blown cotton residue,
Texas: Tulia, weeds near cotton gin covered with blown cotton residue
USA: Vermont, Stowe Hollow riverbank vegetation on Christmas Day, covered with snow
USA: Vermont, Stowe Hollow riverbank vegetation on Christmas Day, covered with snow
East Africa, Kenya, Amboseli National Park, vine-covered tree at sunset, Thomson's gazelles
East Africa, Kenya, Amboseli National Park, vine-covered tree at sunset, Thomson’s gazelles

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_photo_challenge/enveloped/

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Art as Activism to Save Our Rivers

“Water meanders in and out of every discipline, so we can never have too many poets, hydrologists, urban planners, biologists, lawyers, writers, physicians, NGO’s, or geologists working to amplify and aid water’s voice”, says artist Basia Irland.
In Irland’s Receding / Reseeding series, river water is frozen, carved into the form of a book, which is embedded with a “riparian text” consisting of local native seeds, and placed back into the stream. The seeds are released as the ice melts in the current. Ireland consults with river restoration biologists and botanists to determine the best seeds for each unique riparian zone. She launches these ice books into rivers all over the world, documenting the process and inviting local communities to be a part of this ceremonial process. Check out Irland’s website to attend events and follow the progress of her important and inspirational work.

Read more about her on National Geographic’s Water Currents Blog.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director