Author Archive

Microbeads – Harm Behind the Product

July 7, 2016

Unknown

It’s time to rethink the hygienic products we use. Those tiny little beads in our peach scented facial scrub are doing much more than just exfoliating our skin. A large number of studies have shown that these tiny microbeads have extremely harmful impacts on the environment.

Once they get swept down the sink, the beads don’t just simply disappear. Microbeads are too small to be caught in wastewater systems, and end up flowing out to pollute our rivers, lakes, and oceans.

In 2011, a survey of the Great Lakes showed that Lake Eerie had up to 600,000 plastic particles per square kilometer.

Thankfully President Obama signed a bipartisan bill in December that bans microbeads, but it won’t take affect until 2017. Just last week, Canada listed microbeads as toxic, and are likely to pass a ban on the product as well.

In the meantime, be conscious of the beauty and hygienic products you are using!

To find out if a product you are considering purchasing has microbeads, there is an app available from Beat The Microbead that will give information on any product when they are scanned.

Here is a list of common products that contain microbeads.

Change your habits and change the world!

USGS Studies Pharmaceuticals in our Streams

June 3, 2016

CA: Santa Barbara, Medicines

 

Blog by Christina Belasco, Project Manager

The USGS just released a study of 59 streams in the Southeastern United States ranging from Georgia to Virginia. Alarmingly, the study showed that every single one of these streams tested positive for pollution by pharmaceutical compounds.

These compounds have a wide variety of negative impacts on the entire aquatic ecosystem including altering the base of the food web, affecting neurotransmitters for many aquatic insects, and affecting the reproductive health of fish.

One of the main causes of this pollution is homeowners’ tendency to flush unused medications down the toilet. There are alternatives to this harmful habit.

There are many community based drug “take-back” programs you may use to dispose of your medicine – call your local government to find out more information. Otherwise disposing your medicine in the trash is the best option. Take action today to prevent your medicine from polluting local waterways.

Share this information with your friends, and let us know how you help keep your streams clean.

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Map of tested streams courtesy of USGS

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