Archive for April, 2015

Thinking GREEN for Earth Day!

April 17, 2015

Earth Day is celebrated around the world on April 22!

How’d it become a global movement? http://bit.ly/1ESgMqz

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Upcoming Artist Talks

April 10, 2015

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Following Rivers with Alison M. Jones

Artist Talk on Saturday 4/11 from 6-7:30pm
Join me as I share the inspiration and creative process behind photographs taken while on expedition in Africa and North America for No Water No Life ®.

Following Rivers, coordinated with the help of NWNL Exhibition Editor Jasmine Graf, is a compelling collection of giclee photographs grouped together with informational captioning that illustrates that what we do in our communities impacts the availability, quality and usage of our freshwater resources.
Photography by Alison M. Jones on view @ Beacon Institute for Rivers & Estuaries
March 14—October 3, 2015 at 199 Main Street in Beacon, NY.
(845) 838-1600

Part of Beacon’s “Second Saturdays” city-wide celebration of free arts + culture events.

Jones_070607_BC_1970_MSunday Lecture 4/26 @ 10:30am

“Caring for Our Watersheds – Locally and Globally”  Dr. Judy Shaw and Alison M. Jones will discuss how stewardship of our watersheds can raise awareness of the threats to freshwater availability, quality and usage in New Jersey’s Raritan River Basin and globally. They will speak about ways to foster upstream and downstream partnerships that can create sustainable resource management solutions.  @ Unitarian Society, 176 Tices Lane, East Brunswick, NJ. (732) 246-3113

Both events are FREE and open to the public.

Will there be enough water when the cranes return?

April 4, 2015

Will there be enough water for these Greater Sandhill Cranes when they return to the San Francisco Bay Delta this fall?

greater sandhill cranes

With the state’s snowpack down to 5% of average, the lowest ever recorded, Governor Brown has mandated a 25% water use reduction. This is the first time an involuntary water reduction mandate has been imposed. Although the means to meet this mandate has been left up to the local water districts, Brown’s executive directive includes some public assistance to replace 50 million square feet of lawns statewide with drought tolerant planting as well as reducing water use on golf courses, cemeteries and large institutions. There will also be a short-term rebate program to “provide monetary incentives for the replacement of inefficient household devices.”

It is important to note the inclusion of concerns for “degraded habitat for many fish and wildlife species, increase wildfire risk, and the threat of saltwater contamination to fresh water supplies in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Bay Delta” in his declaration. The Fresno Bee reported today that 50.2% of water use in California is by the environment, 40.9% by agriculture and 8.9% by residents and businesses. Although the 25% reduction is directed only at residential and business uses, water that goes to agriculture will now be closely monitored and evaluated for future plan making. This is an important step.

Everyone needs to use water wisely so that we may have enough water to drink, enough water for wildlife and their habitat, as well as enough to grow our food. The farmers in the Central Valley have already been hit hard with spartan allocations for the year. Produce prices will inevitably rise due to the higher cost of water, and the effect of the California drought will be felt across the country. It all comes down to the availability of water. Let’s all conserve. There is no more water, and what we have we are using up.

* Posted from San Francisco by Barbara Folger, NWNL Project Coordinator.

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