The Arkansas Delta

The Mississippi, Arkansas and White Rivers irrigate the flat, fertile lands of the Arkansas Delta, as do the many tributaries, bayous and irrigation ditches. Either muddy water or sandy, dry soil is underfoot – nothing in between. But it is the mix of the two that yields the state’s renowned crops of cotton, soy, corn, … Continue reading The Arkansas Delta

Brain-eating amoeba in Louisiana’s water

Naegleria fowleri  (also known as the "brain-eating amoeba") is a free-living, thermophilic excavate form of protist typically found in warm bodies of fresh water, such as ponds, lakes, rivers, and hot springs. It is also found in soil, near warm-water discharges of industrial plants, and in poorly chlorinated, or unchlorinated swimming pools.... N. fowleri can … Continue reading Brain-eating amoeba in Louisiana’s water

America’s energy leftovers makes its mark

The world's largest deposits of "recoverable" coal are in the U.S. Will we always be exporting coal? - Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Coal exports threaten human health, aquatic life and degrade natural resources

USACE is pulling out of its study of the coal terminal in Portland, Oregon since tribal fishing rights are stopping the process. This is great news, as the Columbia Riverkeeper notes, for the health of the anadromous fish populations as well as human communities in the Lower Columbia River Basin. But this news puts more … Continue reading Coal exports threaten human health, aquatic life and degrade natural resources

“They think we’re all gonna drown down here. But we ain’t going nowhere.” – Hushpuppy

Isle de Jean Charles NWNL is headed to the "Bathtub!" - The geographic inspiration for the movie, "Beasts of the Southern Wild." As director, Benh Zeitlin put it, "This is the edge of the world." Isle de Jean Charles is a sliver of marshland, deep in the bayous of Louisiana - also ground zero for … Continue reading “They think we’re all gonna drown down here. But we ain’t going nowhere.” – Hushpuppy

Charcoal burning destroys Kenya’s forests

  How many trees are cut down to make one bag of charcoal? This illegal trade destroys endangered animals natural habitat and puts pressure on the entire ecosystem. Fact - In Kenya, charcoal provides energy for 82% of urban and 34% of rural households. Source: http://asokoinsight.com/news/illegal-logging-charcoal-burning-destroying-east-africas-forests/ - Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Historic Powerhouse on the Snake River

Swan Falls Dam, built in 1901, is the oldest hydroelectric dam on the Snake River and is on the National Register of Historic Places. This photo shows the scrub and sage brush that covers most of the land around the Snake River in western and south-central Idaho. If anyone is going to grow anything, they … Continue reading Historic Powerhouse on the Snake River