Archive for January, 2014

I Am RED – a must see video poem

January 31, 2014

The Colorado River —
The Most Endangered River in America 2013

I have run these canyons for six million years.

I have traveled from the Rocky Mountains to the deserts, through scorching heat, and freezing cold. 

From the land of the dinosaurs to fields of food.

I lend my hand to seven states, two countries, nine National Parks and 36 million people across an arid west.

I am not the strongest or the largest, but I am the hardest working.

People love me, my playfulness, my beauty, my power, my life.

But I don’t think I can offer any more.

I am tired, tapped and tied.

Of the hundreds of major rivers in the world, I am one of the few who no longer kisses the sea.

Battles to harness my soul have been won and lost.

Use me wisely and I will sustain you.

Use me like you have and I will break.

My name is Red.

The Grand River, Red.

The American Nile.

The Canyon Maker.

I am the Colorado River.

And I am the most endangered river in America.

—-

Directed and written by Pete McBride Productions.
Cinematography: Pete McBride, Ron Chapple, Skip Armstrong, Kontent Films.
Still Imagery: Pete McBride
Voices: Duke Beardsley, Alma del Rio.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Happy Chinese New Year of the Horse!

January 31, 2014
US: Washington, horse and barn
US: Washington, horse and barn

Wishing all watersheds enough rain and snow
to recharge their rivers and fields!
Hopefully this new year will bring more efficient irrigation technologies and more drought tolerant crops being planted,
because agriculture consumes 75-80%
of clean fresh water on this planet.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Let fact springboard us to stewardship.

January 29, 2014

“Climate change is a fact. And when our children’s children look us in the eye and ask if we did all we could to leave them a safer, more stable world, with new sources of energy, I want us to be able to say yes, we did.”

~ President Obama, State of the Union, Jan. 28, 2014

USA: New Jersey, stream monitoring of the Raritan watershed

USA: New Jersey, stream monitoring of the Raritan watershed

Juxtapositions – industry vs. nature?

January 24, 2014
USA: Tennessee, Tennessee River Basin, Kingston, TVA's coal fly ash spill, Swan Pond Road

USA: Tennessee, Tennessee River Basin, Kingston, TVA’s coal fly ash spill, Swan Pond Road

USA:  Louisiana,  Atchafalaya Basin, Stephensville, discarded car tire in swamp with bits of invasive salvinia growing on it

USA: Louisiana, Atchafalaya Basin, Stephensville, discarded car tire in swamp with bits of invasive salvinia growing on it

USA:  Louisiana, Aerial photo of Atchafalaya Basin area, oil rigs in Cote Blanche Bay

USA: Louisiana, Aerial photo of Atchafalaya Basin area, oil rigs in Cote Blanche Bay

USA: West Virginia, Ohio River Basin, Huntington, parking lot

USA: Tennessee, Appalachia, Tennessee River Basin, Knoxville, fuel storage tanks on Tennessee River, sunset
USA: Tennessee, Appalachia, Tennessee River Basin, Knoxville, fuel storage tanks on Tennessee River, sunset

 

Selected juxtapositions from the Mississippi River Basin in response to the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge.

– Posted by Jasmine Graf, NWNL Associate Director

Happy Friday!

January 17, 2014

 

EDUCATION IS KEY !

 

Full Wolf Moon Tonite! – HOWL!

January 15, 2014
USA:  Montana, Bozeman, "Cheyenne," rescued Grey wolf (Canis lupus)

USA: Montana, Bozeman, “Cheyenne,” rescued Grey wolf (Canis lupus)

Tonight’s full moon is known as the Full Wolf Moon. This name dates back to Native American tribes in the Northern and Eastern United States. According to the Farmer’s Almanac, “Amid the cold and deep snows of midwinter, the wolf packs howled…”

The wolf is a keystone species in our watersheds. This oft-maligned canine plays a critical role in naturally balancing water quantity in upper and lower river basins. Visiting the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem in 2008, No Water No Life witnessed wolves protecting our water supplies and preventing downstream destruction and degradation in the Missouri-Mississippi watersheds.

The presence of wolves along riverbanks keeps heavy browsers (such as elk and moose) back in the cover of forests. But – without the wolf, riverside vegetation is quickly devoured. Without bushes, sedges and grasses, riverbanks quickly destabilize and erode. Without riverine willows, beavers can’t build dams. Without beaver dams and riverside vegetation, nature’s moderating water–retention system becomes ineffective. All these changes exacerbate the increase in floods and droughts downstream these days.

Let’s take advantage of nature’s free gift of wolves and howl with them in the full moon tonight!!!

haiku for you

January 8, 2014

Jones_080531_WY_5320icicles and water
old differences
dissolved…
drip down together

– teishitsu

Make a New Years Resolution about how you will reduce your water consumption.

January 7, 2014

reduce water consumption

Make a #NewYearsResolution about how you will reduce your water consumption. For more ideas go to #http://bit.ly/1apwkPn .

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